Rabbits could be a blooming pest

A RUTHLESS contender in East Anglia's biggest floral competition has threatened to scupper the chances of its Suffolk neighbour by unleashing a secret weapon of destruction.

A RUTHLESS contender in East Anglia's biggest floral competition has threatened to scupper the chances of its Suffolk neighbour by unleashing a secret weapon of destruction.

Determined Anglia in Bloom hopeful Wisbech warned it would direct a hungry pack of rabbits to flower beds in their rival town of Bury St Edmunds in a bid to sneak first prize.

The dirty trick has been conjured up by the Cambridgeshire town, which has had its entry into this year's Anglia in Bloom competition marred by dozens of the long-eared vandals.

While they are proving quite a popular attraction, the bunnies are giving exasperated competition organisers a touch of indigestion.


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So instead of letting the rabbits enjoy their new found home, officials came up with the rather underhand idea of redirecting the offenders to other parts of East Anglia.

But Bury in Bloom bosses said they would not take the threat lying down, and have vowed to fight off any four-legged intruders and win the competition themselves.

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The threat was made by tourism officer for Fenland District Council, Penny Stocks, following complaints that the rabbits were chomping their way through the town's entry.

Since September, they have nibbled and munched their way through dozens of rose bushes, and in one patch just two yellow roses have survived and flowered - a far cry from the spectacular display officials were hoping for.

"They may look cute and fluffy but just look at what the little blighters have done," said Mrs Stocks.

"It's our turn to win this year, so let's direct them to Bury and leave them to it."

The comment enraged Julia Rackowe, Bury in Bloom sponsorship co-ordinator, who said Wisbech can throw anything they like at the town's entry.

"We will win through it. Having survived this spring's hanging basket ban scare, we are not planning on succumbing to the curse of the wicked Wisbech bunnies," she added.

Anglia in Bloom president and Bury resident Mike Ames said the rabbits could stay where they are.

"I am sure the rabbits in question where not bred in this area, and if they were we most certainly do not want them back."

It will now be the job of green-fingered officials to secure Bury a stake in the competition, which will be judged between July 12 to 30, and keep the furry friends at bay.

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