Racing stables plan for Aldeburgh

A REDUNDANT game farm on the Suffolk coast could be turned into a horse racing stables if plans are approved by district councillors.Suffolk Coastal District Council has received an application to build stables at Clover Lea, Nuttery Lane, Aldringham, near Aldeburgh, for the breeding and keeping of racing and thoroughbred horses.

By Richard Smith

A REDUNDANT game farm on the Suffolk coast could be turned into a horse racing stables if plans are approved by district councillors.

Suffolk Coastal District Council has received an application to build stables at Clover Lea, Nuttery Lane, Aldringham, near Aldeburgh, for the breeding and keeping of racing and thoroughbred horses.

Mike Tilbrook wants to set up the stables on the site, which is currently described as having a very run-down feel to it.


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The aim is to have two grooms, one of whom would be required to live on the site if permission is granted to convert an outbuilding into a home.

Neil Ward, planning agent for Mr Tilbrook, said: “It is either proposed to breed horses on site or to buy in horses as foals and then to keep and train them before selling them as yearlings.

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“Consequently there will be a turnover of approximately 12 horses per year. The horses will be kept in the stables and grazed on land within Mr Tilbrook's holding at Clover Lea and so there will be minimal additional activities associated with the use.”

He said the horses were a form of farm diversification and Government guidelines supported equine use in the countryside.

The town council's planning committee has recommended approval and Bill Richardson, chairman, said: “We thought it was a very good plan. I think the only contentious thing appeared to be some wrangle about passing vehicles on what is essentially a footpath that has been increased in size.

“There is plenty of land around there and I think the two parties could come to an amicable arrangement.”

Neighbour Susan Turner is objecting to the plan. Barker Gotelee solicitors, acting for her, said: “The application will result in a significant intensification of a commercial use bringing with it highway and traffic problems and dangers.

“Nuttery Lane is a public footpath and bridleway. It is a narrow single track with no passing places. The increased traffic movement is likely to increase the risk of danger to walkers and horses.

“That part of Nuttery Lane within our client's ownership has since 1982 been maintained by her exclusively, apart from one contribution by the BBC who own the mast near the applicant's house.

“This proposal, if granted, will intensify the use of the common parts of this lane but at present there is no proposal from the applicant to contribute to its upkeep and this our client believes is wrong.

“If this application is granted we believe that a legally enforceable obligation should be imposed upon the applicant to assist in the maintenance of this lane according to user.''

In 2000 the district council refused permission for Mr Tilbrook to convert an agricultural grain store building into an industrial unit.

The county council objected on the grounds that the lane was too narrow for lorries and extra traffic and this would increase the risk of accidents.

The game farm was run by Mr Tilbrook for 20 years until he closed with a loss of several full-time jobs after a dispute over the size of a bill for non-domestic rates.

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