Rare lamb quadruplets born on east Suffolk farm

Steve Swan and Farran Hessey with the lambs. Picture; SARAH LUCY BROWN

Steve Swan and Farran Hessey with the lambs. Picture; SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant

The team at Easton Farm Park, near Framlingham, have been astounded this year with the arrival of not one but two sets of quadruplets.

A ewe at Easton Farm Park has given birth to quadruplet lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

A ewe at Easton Farm Park has given birth to quadruplet lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant

The team at Easton Farm Park, near Framlingham, have been astounded this year with the arrival of not one but two sets of quadruplets.

Normally sheep only have one or two lambs at a time with ewes usually giving birth during the spring after a short five month pregnancy.

Quadruplet lambs are very rare and staff really felt like they had, had the wool pulled over their eyes when two ewes at the farm gave birth to four lambs each in the space of only two days.

It’s the first time this has ever happened at the farm but has proved to be very exciting for visitors who herd the good news have flocked to see the new additions to the farm.

Farran Hessey with one of the lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Farran Hessey with one of the lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant


You may also want to watch:


Jordan Bailey, Easton Farm Park manager said: “We had a busy day with plenty of visitors and loads of people around, the first ewe gave birth to what we thought were twins and then carried on.

“We had to call over a couple more colleagues to help out.

Most Read

“It was fantastic to see them all well and the same size.”

After being born the ewes and their lambs were placed into a small pen to give them a few days together away from the flock and to make sure the mother and babies have time to bond.

A ewe at Easton Farm Park has given birth to quadruplet lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

A ewe at Easton Farm Park has given birth to quadruplet lambs. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant

It’s a very important time for the woolly youngsters as this is the time the lamb learns the smell and sound of its mother .

Every mother’s bleat is unique, much like a fingerprint.

With so many extra mouths to feed the farm have needed a lot of extra bottled milk to keep everyone alive and wool.

The newborns will now stick to this diet of milk for the next four months before moving on to grain, grass and hay.

They will stay with their mothers until they are five months old and will be fully grown about a month later.

There’s no time for staff to be sheepish as the lambs are just a few of the fresh faced youngsters that need looking after on the farm.

Fiona Siddall, owner of the farm park said: “Mornings are now very hectic on the farm with 49 lambs, 8 piglets, 8 kids and a calf with lots more on the way including a Suffolk Punch which we hope will be delivered soon.”

For now both sets of quads are on show for visitors to see in the maternity wing at the farm.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter