Recycling plant gets go ahead

A WASTE recycling firm has been given the go-ahead for a new plant – despite the fears of a neighbouring printing business.Printing firm William Clowesclaimed the new recycling centre, at an industrial estate in Ellough, near Beccles, would create a "dust disaster" to its operations.

A WASTE recycling firm has been given the go-ahead for a new plant – despite the fears of a neighbouring printing business.

Printing firm William Clowesclaimed the new recycling centre, at an industrial estate in Ellough, near Beccles, would create a "dust disaster" to its operations.

But applicants, Stephen and Shirley Lake, convinced Suffolk county councillors they had done everything they could to limit any disruption, including increasing the size of their building so recycling is done undercover.

They said they felt "vindicated" by yesterday'sdecision by


You may also want to watch:


The county council's development control sub-committee to give the plans the go-ahead, while William Clowes criticised it as "foolish and irresponsible".

The new waste transfer station, in Aston Way, will be just 70 yards from where William Clowes is now building its new premises. It will handle construction and demolition waste.

Most Read

Ian Foyster, the printing company's managing director, had objected to the application, saying it would be "disastrous" if dust generated by the plant got into its presses.

He said the new waste recycling station would jeopardise the future of the company and its 170 employees.

Members of Suffolk County Council's development control sub-committee gave the plans the go-ahead, subject to a number of conditions.

They include ensuring no concrete is crushed at the site and that no waste is screened or stored outside, vehicles entering or leaving the site are sheeted and a that two-metre high fence is built at the front of the site. Measures will also be taken to cut down on dust.

Councillors had previously paid a visit to the site and Mrs Lake told yesterday's meeting: "We feel we have demonstrated our processes to you and they are without damage to anyone or the environment."

The applicants had already agreed to enlarge their proposed building from 108 square metres to 450 square metres so most operations can be carried out undercover.

Labour councillor Marie Rodgers said she believed the applicants had "bent over backwards" to provide all the necessary safeguards.

The meeting heard William Clowes had originally looked into incorporating an airlock into its new premises, but has not done so.

After the meeting, Mrs Lake said: "We are very, very pleased – we have been vindicated. It has been a long fight."

The firm, which employs five people and has been in business for 17 years, hopes to move to the new premises within the next six months.

Mr Foyster, who oversees his firm's move within the next week, said: "I'm disappointed by the decision – I think it is foolish and irresponsible.

"An international printing firm adjacent to a builders' waste disposal unit is not ideal. There are 50 acres of land (at the industrial estate) and the waste disposal unit could go somewhere else.

"But if that's the decision, we'll have to make the most of it and get on with our lives. We will have to protect our business so we will not be affected. Our plans will evolve."

Clowes is a specialist manufacturer of reference, directories and consumer books, including Who's Who and dictionaries.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter