Ideal home - robins build nest in broken teapot

One of the robins bringing food to its young in its teapot nest in Sudbury

One of the robins bringing food to its young in its teapot nest in Sudbury - Credit: Amanda Cooper

This robin chose an extremely unusual spot for its nest in Sudbury - a broken teapot.

Bird lover Amanda Cooper has enjoyed seeing the feathered family's progress as the eggs were laid and the chicks hatched.

"They just came along and took up home - I was really surprised," Ms Cooper said.

Amanda Cooper with one of the robins feeding in her Sudbury garden

Amanda Cooper with one of the robins feeding in her Sudbury garden - Credit: Andy Rushworth

"I put the teapot on the side of the garage, in my back garden, because I had broken the lid.

"I just thought I would see what happened, but it's quite a big hole, so I wasn't sure if birds would want to nest in there. The next day, I saw a robin start building its nest."


You may also want to watch:


The robin was voted the UK's favourite bird in a national poll, and the birds are famed for nesting almost anywhere.

National charity the Woodland Trust said the birds have nested in "kettles, lanterns, flower pots, car bonnets, boots, post boxes and even clothes pockets."  

Most Read

Ms Cooper, who works as a domestic cleaner,  said she and partner Andy Rushworth had got used to the robins in the teapot. "We both think it's amazing." 

The robin feeding its chicks - three little mouths are just visible.

The robin feeding its chicks - three little mouths are just visible. - Credit: Andy Rushworth

She added: "I love to sit and watch the birds in the garden, but I wouldn't say I'm really a bird-watcher - I'm not a twitcher!"

The birds are quite bold and have got used to having food laid on.

"I have been soaking mealworms in water and putting them out. One of the robins was waiting for me to put out fresh warm mealworms this morning."

One of the chicks has just fledged, and Ms Cooper said: "It's so cute with its fluffy head, glad I didn’t miss it. It went and hid in the shrubs."

Now, even before the current nest is empty, the birds are already looking forward to their next brood, and preparing to move home.

A robin about to help itself to food

A robin about to help itself to food - Credit: Andy Rushworth

"The robins are now busy building another nest, near to their original one, in a nest box," Ms Cooper said.

"They are non-stop busy, feeding the remaining babies and getting ready to start again." 

The main breeding season for nesting birds usually runs throughout March to August, and the RSPB recommends cutting hedges and trees is avoided during those times. 

Suffolk Police's rural crime team also recently reminded Suffolk homeowners of the law surrounding birds' nests.

Under the Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) it is an offence to intentionally take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is in use or being built, and there is also legal protection for birds, chicks and eggs.


Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus