Row over music led to stabbing

A MAN killed his friend in a frenzied knife attack during a late-night row about loud music, it has been alleged. Kwabena Asumadu stabbed 22-year-old Prince Kofi Koomson 13 times in a bedroom of the house they shared in Bury St Edmunds in the early hours of Christmas Eve after Mr Koomson asked Asumadu to turn down his music, Ipswich Crown Court was toldThe two men, who are both Ghanaian nationals, worked together in a car cleaning and valeting business and the court heard there had been growing resentment on the part of Asumadu towards Mr Koomson in the weeks before the alleged stabbing because he was earning less than him.

A MAN killed his friend in a frenzied knife attack during a late-night row about loud music, it has been alleged.

Kwabena Asumadu stabbed 22-year-old Prince Kofi Koomson 13 times in a bedroom of the house they shared in Bury St Edmunds in the early hours of Christmas Eve after Mr Koomson asked Asumadu to turn down his music, Ipswich Crown Court was told

The two men, who are both Ghanaian nationals, worked together in a car cleaning and valeting business and the court heard there had been growing resentment on the part of Asumadu towards Mr Koomson in the weeks before the alleged stabbing because he was earning less than him.

Asumadu, 28, has pleaded not guilty to murdering Mr Koomson at their home in St John's Place, Bury St Edmunds on December 24 last year.

Graham Parkins QC, prosecuting, told the court that Asumadu and Mr Koomson shared their rented house with work colleague Daniel Frimpong and one of his friends, Edward Kantanka, had also been staying at the premises since mid December.

Asumadu, Mr Koomson and Mr Frimpong all worked at a garage in Bury St Edmunds, but while Mr Koomson and Mr Frimpong were paid per car they cleaned Asumadu was paid a flat weekly rate which tended to be less than that earned by the other two.

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On the day before the stabbing Asumadu had gone out with Mr Kantanka and had been moaning to him about the amount he earned and accused Mr Frimpong and Mr Koomson of “conniving” against him. He had then added “It's going to get bloody some day,” the court heard.

“If he uttered these words you may think it was prophetic, bearing in mind what he did with a knife a few hours later,” said Mr Parkins.

He said that Asumadu and Mr Kantanka had returned to St John's Place at about 11pm after visiting some local pubs.

A urine sample taken from Asumadu at 4am the following morning showed a level of alcohol in his system that would have caused an average person to be drunk, said Mr Parkins.

When the men arrived home Mr Koomson was watching television in the living room and after a while had gone upstairs. Asumadu stayed in the living room and began dancing to Ghanaian music he was playing on a computer.

After a while Mr Koomson had come downstairs and asked him to turn the music down and Asumadu replied that he contributed to the bills and could do what he wanted, said Mr Parkins.

Mr Koomson had complained again shortly afterwards and had then returned upstairs where he telephoned Mr Frimpong, who was visiting relatives in London, and complained to him about Asumadu's behaviour.

Mr Frimpong then rang Asumadu's mobile phone and when it was answered he could hear Mr Koomson shouting: “Leave me alone or you will kill me.”

Meanwhile, Mr Kantanka, who was downstairs, heard a loud scream followed by silence. Shortly afterwards he saw Asumadu came downstairs with blood on his lip and leave the house.

Alarmed by what he had heard on the telephone, Mr Frimpong rang Mr Kantanka who then ran upstairs and found Mr Koomson lying on the floor.

Mr Parkins said Mr Koomson had suffered 13 stab wounds to his body including two, which according to an expert, would have required “substantial” force to inflict.

During police interviews Asumadu said he had some difficulties with Mr Koomson relating to work and pay issues and the way he was treated by him.

He claimed that on the night of the stabbing Mr Koomson had been aggressive towards him and had kicked him causing his nose to bleed. “I lost my mind and I don't know what I was doing,” he said.

Mr Parkins said that Asumadu told police that Mr Koomson had been begging him during the attack but by then the harm had been done.

He said he could not remember how many times he had stabbed Mr Koomson.

The trial continues today.