RSPCA worry at mistreated pets

OVER 5,000 pets in the East of England were rescued after being unwanted, abandoned or mistreated last year - a third of them being cats, new RSPCA figures have revealed.

OVER 5,000 pets in the East of England were rescued after being unwanted, abandoned or mistreated last year - a third of them being cats, new RSPCA figures have revealed.

The figures show how more than double the amount of cats are beings rescued through neglect compared to dogs.

In total, nearly 27,000 animals were rescued in the region in 2006, while nationally the figures rose by 40%.

Andy Foxcroft, chief officer of RSPCA inspectorate, said: "We rescue a staggering number of animals from a wide range of difficult, distressing and often surprising situations each year.


You may also want to watch:


"But what strikes me particularly about our latest figures is the huge number of animals we rescue simply because their owners no longer want them.

"With the new Animal Welfare Act now in force - which means owners are legally obliged to find out about their pet's particular needs and care for it properly - we really hope more people will consider the full responsibility they are taking on before getting an animal.

Most Read

"Hopefully this will mean the RSPCA rescuing fewer unwanted animals."

Mark Thompson, RSPCA chief inspector for Fenland, which covers Suffolk, urged people taking on pets in the region to realise their responsibilities as owners.

“Many people buy these pets as cute kittens or puppies and need to realise they are taking on a long-term commitment,” he said.

The figures were released to coincide with RSPCA week, the charity's largest annual fundraising drive.

Award-winning comedian Ricky Gervais, star of The Office and a cat owner, is backing the campaign.

The animal charity revealed that for the second year cat owners were most likely to decide they no longer wanted their pet.

Mark Thompson added the RSPCA were urging owners of cats and dogs to have microchips fitted to their pets.

He said: “We rescue cats who we then struggle to relocate owners for and we would urge everyone with a cat or dog to have a microchip fitted and then we can reunite them with their pets and it really does help.”

The microchips cost under £20 from local vets and are placed beneath the skin of the neck of the animal.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus