Sculpture tribute to past generations

By John HowardA BLACKSMITH has created a sculpture from agricultural machinery as homage to the workers that toiled on the land in past generations.Artistic blacksmith Graham Chaplin created the artwork at his Iron Oak Forge in Buxhall, near Stowmarket, using old equipment, including pieces from tractors and ploughs.

By John Howard

A BLACKSMITH has created a sculpture from agricultural machinery as homage to the workers that toiled on the land in past generations.

Artistic blacksmith Graham Chaplin created the artwork at his Iron Oak Forge in Buxhall, near Stowmarket, using old equipment, including pieces from tractors and ploughs.

The 25ft steel sculpture, called Spiritus Mundi, which is Latin for Earth's Energy, will go on display at the Museum of East Anglian Life in Stowmarket when it opens for the new season on March 28.


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Mr Chaplin said: “This links from today right back through history to the agricultural workers, the plough man, it's all in there.

“It started out as a weather vane idea, but moved on from there. I wanted to create something light and elegant that swung gently with the breeze, something that connected to the ley line energy.

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“These prehistoric lines of power, the remnants of science and philosophy which are obscure to us in the modern world, coincide with the direction of the rising sun on or near May Day.

“I hope people will react in some way, positively or negatively, any reaction is better than none at all.”

Andrew Stringer, a Green member of Mid Suffolk District Council, will officially unveil the sculpture at a ceremony today.

Mr Stringer said: “It is almost ironic that this piece reuses equipment which people working the land used with their blood, sweat and tears.

“It relates to earthly energies and may regenerate respect for the countryside, help people look at the countryside in a different way.”

He added: “It's rather amazing, a stunning thing. It will create different reactions in different people, but that's the whole point of art.

“This is a piece of fine art, not something that was kicked together in a back shed. I know Graham has put a lot of study and research in to it. Hopefully it will attract more people in to the museum to see it.”

Lisa Harris, collections manager at the museum, said it was wonderful to see pieces of the region's heritage reused in such an imaginative way.

She added: “It's great, looks really good and stands out nicely. It's a superb re-use of our heritage.”

john.howard@eadt.co.uk

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