Search

Paramedic 'absolutely regrets' decision not to take six-year-old boy with meningitis B to hospital

PUBLISHED: 19:33 04 June 2019 | UPDATED: 19:33 04 June 2019

Oliver Hall, six, died in October 2017 Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie Hall

Oliver Hall, six, died in October 2017 Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie Hall

Archant

The paramedic who first assessed a six-year-old boy who died of meningitis B just hours later said he wishes he had taken him straight to hospital, an inquest has heard.

Oliver Hall in hospital fighting for his life, just four and a half hours before he died. Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie HallOliver Hall in hospital fighting for his life, just four and a half hours before he died. Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie Hall

Oliver Hall died at the James Paget Hospital on October 24, 2017, having been suffering from a high fever, non-blanching rashes on his body, sensitivity to light and aching limbs in the hours before.

On the second day of an inquest into his death, Ipswich Coroner's Court heard evidence from Graham Scott, the senior paramedic who was sent to the Hall's family home in Halesworth after Ollie's mother Georgie called the 111 emergency number.

On Monday, Mr and Mrs Hall told the inquest Mr Scott's behaviour had been "unprofessional" and "dismissive of Oliver's state".

They claimed Mr Scott had also started mimicking grunting noises his young patient was making. Giving evidence, Mr Scott said he could not remember making comments of that nature.

Oliver Hall Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie HallOliver Hall Picture: Courtesy of Bryan and Georgie Hall

The hearing heard that after assessing Ollie in bed, the decision was made to take him to the local GP rather than straight to hospital.

Mr Scott said: "I absolutely regret my decision to take him to the GP. I wish I had taken him to hospital straight away."

Ollie was taken to the Cutlers Hill Surgery in Halesworth where he was assessed by a trainee GP Dr Lester Braganza.

However, the inquest heard Dr Braganza cut short his assessment to bring in the view of Dr Daniel Treen, another GP at the surgery.

Oliver Hall lost his short battle with meningitis B in October 2017. Picture: Bryan and Georgie HallOliver Hall lost his short battle with meningitis B in October 2017. Picture: Bryan and Georgie Hall

Despite identifying non-blanching rashes, which remain after pressing them with a glass, an elevated heart beat and a high temperature, it was decided that Ollie could go home with his parents.

Giving evidence, Dr Treen said that he felt Mrs Hall did not have a chance to fully get her views across with four health professions - a trainee GP, a GP and two paramedics - in the room as well.

The inquest heard how vital observations, including checking whether there were further rashes on Ollie's body, were not passed between the two doctors.

Ollie's symptoms worsened through the day prompting Mrs Hall to call the GP again.

He was rushed to the surgery where Dr Treen called an ambulance.

The inquest, which is expected to last five days, continues.

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the East Anglian Daily Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists