Service to pray for brave James

A SPECIAL service is being organised in a village church to pray for help for a teenager who is battling a rare form of cancer.James Bevan, 19, who has been given only a 10% chance of survival, is expected to attend subject to feeling well enough and also present will be his parents, other members of his family and friends throughout the community.

A SPECIAL service is being organised in a village church to pray for help for a teenager who is battling a rare form of cancer.

James Bevan, 19, who has been given only a 10% chance of survival, is expected to attend subject to feeling well enough and also present will be his parents, other members of his family and friends throughout the community.

James, who lives with friends in Ipswich, underwent his first session of chemotherapy on Wednesday as doctors try to combat a cancer which apparently began on the skin and has spread to the bone marrow and lungs.

His parents, Mike and Beverley Bevan, who live at Stradbroke, travelled with him to the Middlesex Hospital in London.


You may also want to watch:


Mr Bevan, 64, said the family was pleased that a special "healing" service had been arranged for Stradbroke Church on February 13.

"The seriousness of the disease was a great shock. But we are humbled by the courage being shown by James and look forward to the future with optimism.

Most Read

"We are hanging in there with him and hoping for the best but we do feel it is so unfair for this to happen to someone so young," he said.

During the time he had been waiting for treatment, James - a promising chef who previously worked at the Park Hotel in Diss and the Lord Nelson in Ipswich - had been encouraged by the hospital to go out and enjoy himself as much as possible.

He had been on holiday to Spain with his girlfriend, Leanne Atkins, taken part in a family trip to Alton Towers and been "treated" to a meal at Jamie Oliver's London restaurant, Fifteen, including a tour of the kitchens.

Mr Bevan said James faced three programmes of chemotherapy and the specialist in charge of the youngster's treatment had made clear that, even if it was not successful, other treatments would be explored.

"Our son is fiercely independent and is continuing to live with his friends. He has a Macmillan nurse and the district nurse calls each day because, immediately following the chemotherapy, there is a high risk of infection," he added.

Rev David Streeter, rector of Stradbroke, said he had known James since he was about two years old and he had later been a member of the church youth group.

"It seems natural for the church to try to help," he said.

Mr Streeter said a rock band made up of friends of the youngster was expected to take part in the service which would be aimed at harnessing the power of prayer.

david.green@eadt.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus