Signwriter’s work to benefit St Nicholas Hospice Care

Wayne Tanswell.

Wayne Tanswell. - Credit: Archant

An exhibition will showcase traditional hand-painted lettering and raise funds for a west Suffolk charity next month.

Writing Wrongs, at The Apex Gallery in Bury St Edmunds, is a display of ‘literal art’ by Sudbury-based traditional sign-writer Wayne Tanswell.

His work combines mixed fonts and quotes painted on recycled materials, merging traditional skills with contemporary flair.

Limited edition signed prints will be for sale at £20 each, with all proceeds to St Nicholas Hospice Care, thanks to The Apex waiving its usual commission and Wayne funding the production of the prints.

He said: “I’ve decided to pay out of my own pocket to have the prints made. I don’t want a penny back as it is my personal thank you to the hospice, which was kind enough to look after my father, Derek, in his final days.

“Over the years, it’s been in the back of my mind that I would like to do something to raise funds.”

Derek Tanswell, who was well-known as the village barber in Long Melford, suffered a brain tumour before he died in October 2007.

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Wayne, 50, has been a signwriter since 1980 and is one of fewer than 300 left in the UK.

His work has been featured on television and he still works across the country and abroad, including spending two weeks painting signs at Waterberry Lodge, in Zambia.

Writing Wrongs has previously been shown in Cambridge and London, but this is the first time the collection has been exhibited in Suffolk.

It will be open from March 3 to April 5 at The Apex Gallery, from 10am-5pm Monday-Saturday and 10am-4pm Sunday.

Visit www.waynetanswell-signwriter.co.uk for more details.

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