Suffolk Covid cases surpass national average in some areas

Suffolk coronavirus infection rates are on the rise still as the country records the highest death toll since April

Suffolk coronavirus infection rates are on the rise still as the country records the highest death toll since April - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

The coronavirus infection rate in some areas of Suffolk has now surpassed the England average and the national death toll is the highest since April.

A further 1,041 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Wednesday, January 6 — the highest since April 21, when 1,224 deaths were recorded.

The latest figures for Suffolk show that in the seven days leading up to January 2, the weekly rolling infection rate in Ipswich exceeded that of the entire country.

The infection rate in Ipswich rose from 318.5 covid cases per 100,000 people in the week leading to December 26, to 607 by January 2. The average for England is 598.3.

The second highest infection rate in the county is in Babergh at 595.4, while the lowest is in East Suffolk at 405.7.

Most areas have seen their infection rate double in the last two weeks, aside from Babergh which already had a rate of 400.9 in the week leading to December 26.

Community leaders in East Suffolk are keen to keep their rates low and have warned they will report unauthorised visitors to the area to the police.

Ipswich has now recorded the highest infection rate in Suffolk 

Ipswich has now recorded the highest infection rate in Suffolk - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown


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North Essex on average has higher infection rates than Suffolk, with the most new cases being recorded in Braintree and Maldon where infection rates are 1159.9 and 1008.8.

While Colchester, Uttlesford and Tendring rates have remained below 1,000 cases per 100,000 people they are still far above the national average.

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MPs retrospectively voted to approve the new lockdown on Wednesday night and just 12 Conservative MPs voted against the third wave of regulations.

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