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Dragon's teeth found in the sands at Minsmere

PUBLISHED: 16:23 13 February 2019 | UPDATED: 12:26 14 February 2019

Mr Finch was walking along the beach when he saw the objects peaking out of the sand Picture: NORMAN FINCH

Mr Finch was walking along the beach when he saw the objects peaking out of the sand Picture: NORMAN FINCH

Archant

Winter storms have revealed a sight from Suffolk’s military past - dragon’s teeth.

The metal objects could be dragons teeth which have been spotted Picture: NORMAN FINCHThe metal objects could be dragons teeth which have been spotted Picture: NORMAN FINCH

While going for his regular walk along the coast between The Coastguard Cottages and the Minsmere Sluice, Norman Finch came across exposed metal spikes which were poking out in the sand.

“I was walking along the shore and I saw the objects were spiked and pointing out to sea,” said Mr Finch.

He was concerned by the site of the spikes, which he believed could be dangerous and could hurt an unsuspecting beach user.

“People do swim off that beach throughout the year,” said Mr Finch.

The mysterious objects were spotted at low tide near Minsmere Picture: NORMAN FINCHThe mysterious objects were spotted at low tide near Minsmere Picture: NORMAN FINCH

“It could end up with somebody getting injured.”

But the spikes are thought to be dragon’s teeth, a type of coastal defence installed in during the Second World War to defend against a potential German invasion.

Mr Finch said: “I walk there every week but I have not seen them before,”

It is thought that it was only because of recent winter storms that the sands were shifted to reveal the significant part of Suffolk’s military history.

The teeth themselves are long metal spikes which have been set in concrete and buried into the sand.

The spikes were designed to tear and puncture vehicles, specifically enemy barges, that may head towards the Suffolk coastline.

They have been found elsewhere on the coast at places like Walberswick and Dunwich, where many have been pulled from the sand using bulldozers over the years.

Last year EDF Energy helped with a clean-up operation to remove what was also believed to be Second World War invasion defences at Sizewell.

The Sizewell defences also appeared following stormy weather.

It is not immediately clear who the landowners are of the site where the dragon’s teeth were found.

It would be the responsibility of the owner to remove the dragon’s teeth from the sand after consultation with Historic England and archaeologists.

The dragon’s teeth are not the only signs of Suffolk’s military history that remain along the coast. Pillboxes and anti-tank pyramids remain along our coast to this day.

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