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Latest coronavirus infection rates show slight rise in cases – check the numbers in your area

The latest number of coronavirus cases in Suffolk has been revealed in weekly public health data. Woodbridge shoppers wear their masks (file photo) Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

The latest number of coronavirus cases in Suffolk has been revealed in weekly public health data. Woodbridge shoppers wear their masks (file photo) Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Charlotte Bond

Some areas of Suffolk and north Essex have recorded a rise in the number of positive Covid-19 tests over the past week, according to the latest public health data.

Public Health England figures out on Friday reveal the number of Covid-19 cases recorded in West Suffolk doubled from five to 10 in the week to Sunday, August 23.

Tendring also recorded a rise in cases, with eight positive coronavirus tests logged in the same time frame, up from three the previous week.

Babergh and East Suffolk’s infection rates did not change week-on-week, with the districts recording three positive cases between them.

MORE: Where can I be tested for coronavirus next week?

The number of cases in Mid Suffolk fell from seven to two, bringing its infection rate down from 6.7 cases per 100,000 people to 1.9 in the week to August 23.

Cases fell from five to four in Ipswich, putting its infection rate at 2.9 per 100,000 people, down from 3.7 the previous week.

And despite some slight increases at a local level, infection rates across Suffolk remained among the lowest in the country.

The county-wide infection rate rose by just one decimal point from 2.8 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in the week to August 16 to 2.9 in the week to August 23.

In that time, 23 people tested positive for the virus in Suffolk, with results collected from hospitals and regional testing sites such as Copdock.

This is the same number as was recorded the previous week.

MORE: School makes face masks compulsory as headteachers welcome ‘flexible’ new rules

To date, 2,782 people have contracted coronavirus across the county.

Suffolk’s latest infection rate of 2.9 tests per 100,000 people puts it among the areas with the lowest numbers of cases in England.

The county has been ranked 142nd out of 150 local authorities for infection rates in the government’s latest weekly situation report. The lower the ranking, the lower the rate of infection.

Meanwhile, Essex’s infection rate has risen from 4.2 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people to 5.6 this week.

Cases in Colchester halved, from eight to four, while Braintree recorded two more cases than it did the previous week.

MORE: ‘Likely’ that parts of Suffolk will be hit by second coronavirus spike this winter

In contrast, Oldham in northern England had the highest rate of coronavirus infection in the country in the week to August 23. It recorded 129 new cases, the equivalent of 52.6 positive tests per 100,000 people.

Norfolk’s infection rate for the week to August 23 rose slightly to 3.3 cases per 100,000 people.

However, this data does not incorporate the 80 positive cases so far detected in the Banham Poultry factory outbreak which was confirmed on Tuesday, August 25.

Norfolk’s infection rate for the following week is likely to have a more significant rise, with data collected over the past few days already beginning to show signs of a spike.

Public health bosses in Suffolk have acknowledged that the county is continuing to have low numbers of cases but urged people to “stay vigilant” and keep to social distancing measures.

MORE: All 800 Banham Poultry staff to be tested for coronavirus


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