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Revealed: The spookiest addresses in Suffolk

PUBLISHED: 09:30 30 October 2020

Suffolk has been revealed as the county with the highest concentration of ghoulish and ghastly street and house names in the UK. Picture: SWNS

Suffolk has been revealed as the county with the highest concentration of ghoulish and ghastly street and house names in the UK. Picture: SWNS

© SWNS

Steeped in history, Suffolk has a total of 50 spooky and supernatural themed house and street names – making it the most macabre in the country.

The term 'cemetery' is the most commonly used in addresses and Ipswich boasts a Cemetery Lane and Cemetery Road.  Picture: SWNSThe term 'cemetery' is the most commonly used in addresses and Ipswich boasts a Cemetery Lane and Cemetery Road. Picture: SWNS

Ahead of Halloween, Royal Mail has revealed a list of scary sounding addresses in the UK, such as Hell Pit Lane, Cackle Cottage and Goblin Farm.

The analysis of more than 30 million addresses found towns and cities with strong historic links such as Ipswich, Hereford and Canterbury, had the highest concentration of morbidly mysterious names.

Suffolk boasts a total of 50 bone-chilling names with 22 in Ipswich, 12 in Bury St Edmunds and more scattered across the county.

While Suffolk claims fame as the most frightening in the UK, other places in the region also rank highly on the list, with Norwich recording 40 spine-tingling names and Diss 13.

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‘Cemetery’ was flagged as the most commonly used creepy term, appearing in more than 800 addresses nationwide.

Ipswich has both a Cemetery Road and a Cemetery Lane, while there are a number of houses named ‘Cemetery Lodge’ around Suffolk.

Woodbridge boasts ‘Dark Lane’ and there are several houses elsewhere in the county named ‘All Hallows’ and most fittingly; ‘October House’.

Other popular terms appearing around the UK included ‘Owls’, ‘Cobwebs’, ‘Dark’ and ‘Hanging’.

Some of the most monstrous names in the nation included ‘Vampire Road’ in London, ‘Creepy Cottage’ near Sheffield and ‘Bleeding Wolf Lane’ near Stoke-On-Trent.

Steve Rooney, head of the Royal Mail Address Management Unit, said: “Named addresses are very often inspired by national or local history, so as a nation fascinated by the macabre, it is perhaps unsurprising that terms linked to this feature so highly in our research.”

MORE: For more spooky stories head to Weird Suffolk


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