Suffolk remembers the voice of racing

THE people of Suffolk yesterday remembered a much-loved commentator with a magical voice who became known as the BBC's voice of racing during his 40-year career.

THE people of Suffolk yesterday remembered a much-loved commentator with a magical voice who became known as the BBC's voice of racing during his 40-year career.

Peter Bromley, who moved to Bulmer, near Sudbury, after retiring in 2001, died on Tuesday night after losing a battle with cancer.

The 74-year-old, who described his first race for BBC radio at Newmarket on May 13, 1959, moved into broadcasting after injury curtailed his career as an amateur jockey.

During his eminent 40-year career, he called home the winners of 202 Classics races, before retiring to Suffolk following his last commentary on Galileo's Vodafone Derby victory in 2001.


You may also want to watch:


Ex-BBC television broadcaster Julian Wilson, who also lives in the county and worked with Mr Bromley for around 32-years, yesterday paid tribute to a dedicated husband and father who fought courageously against his illness.

"He was a very kind person and very much a family man," said Mr Wilson. "He was devoted to his wife Jo and his three daughters, and moved from Berkshire to Suffolk after retiring in 2001 so he could be closer to his children and grandchildren.

Most Read

"Peter was a countryman, a rifleman and a very good shot, so Suffolk was a great place for him to lead that sort of life.

"He only lived in the county during the two years before he died, but was very happy here and settled easily into the Suffolk countryside."

Mr Wilson said his colleague was diagnosed with cancer a year ago, fighting the illness bravely until his death on Tuesday.

"He battled very courageously and bravely, but had been ill for a long time," he continued. "He was a very companionable man and will be missed. He had a lot of friends.

"Peter was also a wonderful broadcaster, with a great voice and great ability to paint pictures with words.

"He would give people sitting in their cars listening to the racing a very clear vision of what was happening on the course, and I personally benefited a great deal from his help when I started broadcasting."

Mr Bromley, who attended meetings at Newmarket following his retirement, will also be associated by many with Red Rum's three Grand National triumphs in the 1970s.

During his career he worked for the Light Programme, Radio 2 and Radio 5 Live, with his time behind the microphone remaining largely uninterrupted for the majority of his years with the Corporation.

The BBC's Cornelius Lysaght paid tribute to this dedication which made his former colleague such a memorable broadcaster on Radio 5 Live yesterday.

"He had that voice to which he could give everything – but would then always go to another level," he said. "He was so very exciting, very inspiring and very descriptive."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus