Suffolk's wedding of the year

IT was the closest Bury St Edmunds has been to the glitz and glamour of all-star West End movie premier or the opening of an up market restaurant.Social commentators had hailed it as the society wedding of the decade, between the epitome of young, posh and loaded Ben Goldsmith and Kate Rothschild, The wedding brought out hundreds of fascinated residents and shoppers to the beautiful surroundings of St Mary's Church.

IT was the closest Bury St Edmunds has been to the glitz and glamour of all-star West End movie premier or the opening of an up market restaurant.

Social commentators had hailed it as the society wedding of the decade, between the epitome of young, posh and loaded Ben Goldsmith and Kate Rothschild,

The wedding brought out hundreds of fascinated residents and shoppers to the beautiful surroundings of St Mary's Church.

As every vehicle pulled outside the church, there were whispers among the throngs as to who would step out from behind the blacked out windows.


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Sir David Frost arrived, closely followed former Rolling Stone Bill Wyman, while former Pakistan cricket legend Imran Khan and the Prince and Princess Michael of Kent opted for the more sedate route of walking the short distance from the Angel Hotel.

But then the whispers turned to the bride – the young, beautiful and former Miss Rothschild.

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"She's arrived" they proclaimed and, like with every wedding before and after, the crowds turned their attentions to the bride putting aside name-dropping and comments.

In a simple but elegant dress, believed to have been designed by the former fashion student bride, the 21-year-old calmly stepped out in the evening sunshine to be greeted with polite applause from the crowd.

Then as the 600 guests sat down for the ceremony, it was all over, the end to all the rumours that had filled the air about the great and the good arriving for the ceremony.

Names such as Camilla Parker Bowles and Prince William had floated around gossip mongers in the weeks leading up to the wedding while many in the town were certain Prince Charles and even rock legend Mick Jagger would make an unexpected appearance.

One woman in the crowd, perhaps dizzy from the paparazzi flash bulbs and beautiful flowing outfits, said maybe footballer David Beckham might turn up but she was disappointed.

While many were struggling to identify the Who's Who of the aristocracy, the general consensus was one of enjoyment.

Jean Russell, of Thurston, said: "It was lovely to see the Prince and Princess Michael of Kent – that was a big thrill for me.

"You don't often get something this big in Bury and I think it is good for the town to have such a big occasion."

Peggy Clark, who had visited the town for a day's shopping with her friend Chris Monk, said: "We just came for the market – we didn't know anything was going on.

"We saw the crowds and heard about the wedding and thought we must have a look. The bride looked lovely although some of the other fashions were half and half."

One man, from Bury St Edmunds who preferred not to give his name, said he only joined the crowds out of curiosity.

He said: "I think it is good for the town and it certainly adds a little jollity into Bury St Edmunds. I have heard of the Goldsmith family but I know nothing about the bride and groom."

Then, as quickly as they arrived, the masses dispersed either home for some tea or to the side entrance of the church to catch a glimpse of the happy couple.

When the new Mr and Mrs Goldsmith emerged, the young couple appeared slightly overawed by the large crowd that had embroiled in front of them.

The groom, casually chewing gum, timidly kissed his bride when prompted by photogpahers before literally driving off into the sunset and a reception at the Rothschild family home Rushbrooke Hall.

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