Suffolk veterans in Nazi crimes probe

NAZI war crime detectives are probing the past of veterans in Suffolk as part of an investigation into Second World War atrocities, it has emerged.A team from the anti-terrorist branch of the Metropolitan Police is investigating alleged crimes committed by the Galician division of the Ukrainian army.

NAZI war crime detectives are probing the past of veterans in Suffolk as part of an investigation into Second World War atrocities, it has emerged.

A team from the anti-terrorist branch of the Metropolitan Police is investigating alleged crimes committed by the Galician division of the Ukrainian army.

The inquiry is thought to focus on the massacre of Jewish and non-Jewish citizens in eastern European countries and the training of Galician members as concentration camp guards.

One Ukrainian veteran, whom the EADT has discovered to be living in Ipswich, declined to comment on his army role when approached.


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And an 82-year-old ex-soldier, found to have been living in the Sudbury area, died last month.

A family member said he had always remained guarded about his involvement in the conflict, adding: “We only knew what we read about when he died. That's when we found out he was in a prisoner of war camp. He never talked about the war.”

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The new Scotland Yard investigation has been prompted by a list of suspected Nazi war criminals passed on by Andrew Dismore, Labour MP for Hendon, north London.

This includes names of soldiers who served in the conflict, many of whom are thought to be living in the UK.

The probe comes almost seven years after the Metropolitan Police disbanded its specialist unit set up to find Nazi war criminals. At the time it was said all lines of inquiry had been exhausted.

But last night a spokeswoman for the Met said: “Current inquiries include a list of names passed to police by an MP earlier this year.

“The list is currently under consideration by the Crimes Against Humanity Unit, which is checking it against material already in its possession. The unit is also liaising with other Government departments, including the Immigration and Nationality Directorate, to establish the best way forward.”

Around 8,000 Ukrainians flooded into the UK in 1947 in a bid to solve post-war labour shortages.

Governments files from the time, released as part of the National Archives last year, show hundreds of the Ukranian POWs were diverted to Suffolk and Norfolk to work in agriculture.

Many settled in the area and started families, having initially been held at the Victoria Camp, in Brandon Road, Mildenhall.

They were captured by Allied forces after being found to have worked with the Nazi forces during the conflict.

Around six families of members of the Galician division are believed to still be living in Suffolk.

Although the list handed to police includes the names of people known to live or have lived in Suffolk, the force spokeswoman was unable to confirm whether any of these individuals would form part of the investigation.

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