Pride theatre show gives young people the confidence to come out

A group of LGBTQ+ youths who attended the museum's pride pizza party in Stowmarket.

A group of LGBTQ+ youths who attended the museum's pride pizza party - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Real-life stories of how members of the LGBTQ+ community who live in rural neighbourhoods have come out were retold on stage in Suffolk yesterday.

The Museum of East Anglian Life in Stowmarket, hosted a pride pizza party for LGBTQ+ youths on Wednesday with a performance by Queer Rural Connections theatre group.

Their production, The Stars are Brighter Here, told the real-life stories of local people and their coming out journeys in rural counties.  

In the audience was 18-year-old Alex, who identifies as transmasculine (or transmasc), and uses the pronouns he/him and they.  

He is still early on in the process of understanding his identity and has only recently started identifying as transmasc – a term used for people who are assigned as female at birth, but who feel a connection with masculinity. However, people who identify as transmasc do not have to be defined as solely male. 

He added: “I’m not a binary trans man and not solely non-binary. I kind of go back and forth between the two. I feel more masculine in who I am, but I don’t feel completely male.”  

The performance, which featured transgender actor Tigger Blaize and gay actor Will Davies, was an eye-opener for Alex and has given him a real boost. 

Tigger Blaize and Will Wyn Davies who performed 'The Stars are Brighter Here' at the Museum of East Anglian Lifen Life

Actors Tigger Blaize and Will Wyn Davies who performed 'The Stars are Brighter Here' at the Museum of East Anglian Life in Stowmarket - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

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“I’ve recently figured out my gender identity and my sexuality, and seeing stories of older trans people and how they’re able to come out and live their true lives, was really nice to see and gives me confidence,” said Alex.

“It’s not as scary as I think it’s going to be because they’re out there living their lives and although they might get the comments, the looks and the stares, they’re still true to themselves. It makes me believe I can do it too.”   

Alex has only told friends and family about how he chooses to identify as he still has concerns about how he will be perceived by others. 

Going forward Alex sees the possibility of one day taking testosterone and undergoing ‘top surgery’ – a procedure which removes breast tissue and gives a more masculine-looking chest. He also hopes to support other queer youths in the future.

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