Teen yob banned from supermarket

AN l8-year-old troublemaker has been banned from entering his local supermarket and its surrounding area after a judge heard of his continued disregard for the law.

AN l8-year-old troublemaker has been banned from entering his local supermarket and its surrounding area after a judge heard of his continued disregard for the law.

Andrew Glynnof Victoria Gardens, Colchester, received an Anti-social behaviour order (ASBO) following his conviction for assault at Colchester Magistrates Court.

After a six-week detention at a youth offender's institute he will be barred indefinitely from entering the Tesco store at Highwoods and nearby Highwoods Square.

Under the ASBO he is also prohibited from being found in possession of alcohol, being found drunk in a public place and assaulting or causing harassment, alarm or distress to any person.


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Insp Tony Dale, of Colchester police said: "Andrew Glynn is part of a troublesome group who for too long have been the perpetrators of significant anti-social behaviour on the Highwoods Estate.

"Others will now hopefully choose to moderate their behaviour, otherwise they too will eventually find themselves before magistrates.

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"I am grateful for the support we have received from the community who now feel more confident to speak out against persistent troublemakers and hopefully more will now be encouraged to do so."

The issuing of the order came on the same day that the Tendring crime and disorder reduction partnership held a seminar into ways to combat anti-social behaviour in the region.

Representatives from Essex County Council, Tendring Council, Tendring Police Division, housing associations, voluntary organisations and schools pooled their thinking on tackling the problem on a partnership basis.

Guest speaker Bill Pitt, who is a recognised expert in tackling anti-social behaviour and head of the nuisance strategy group for Manchester housing.

Sgt John Ross, said: "The seminar was a great success and the feedback was very positive.

"We are quite new to the problem of anti-social behaviour and so what Mr Pitt told us was of great importance, outlining just what we could achieve and how we could do it."

Chief Supt Dave Hudson, commander of Tendring Police Division, added: "The seminar was an important step in getting all the agencies involved working together.

"The main thing is that no one is working alone - it is a partnership. Everyone that attended is committed to this and left the meeting with a renewed vigour to tackle nuisance behaviour.

"But it must be stressed that answers will not be found overnight. We have to first get a system in place and then co-operate in order to make a difference."

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