Teenager beat grandmother's dog to death

A TEENAGER battered his grandmother's Jack Russell dog to death with a gate post and threw its carcass at her.Christopher Munns admitted striking the dog on the head, back and legs with a two foot piece of timber studded with screws.

A TEENAGER battered his grandmother's Jack Russell dog to death with a gate post and threw its carcass at her, a court heard yesterday .

Christopher Munns admitted striking the dog on the head, back and legs with a two foot piece of timber studded with screws.

Mildenhall magistrates heard that the 18-year-old, who pleaded guilty to causing an animal unnecessary suffering, attacked the eight-year-old pet after the dog bit him on the arm and finger.

The court heard how Munns - who could be handed a custodial sentence for the crime - had been left in charge of his grandparents' smallholding in Sedge Fen, near Lakenheath, for the evening on March 20.


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When his grandmother, Charlotte James, returned home with her disabled husband Kelvin she was shocked to find her treasured pet Floss battered and bleeding at the foot of the stairs.

Munns, of Saham Hill, Norfolk, complained that the dog had bitten him, the court heard.

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But speaking to Bury St Edmunds police after the attack, he conceded the injuries he received were not as bad as he had thought at the time and the bite to the arm was only a bruise.

He said: “I don't know how many times I hit her- I just got really mad.”

After attacking the dog, he continued to row with his grandparents and they decided to phone the police.

At that point he picked up the dog's carcass and threw it at his 64 year-old grandmother, shouting “have your f*****g dog”, the court was told.

Michael Taylor, prosecuting on behalf of the RSPCA, said the dog had not died instantly but was conscious throughout the attack.

Reading a veterinary pathology report, he said the dog died from internal bleeding into the lungs after the “extremely painful” beating meted out by Munns.

Claire Lockwood, for Munns, said he had shown remorse but could offer no explanation for his actions. She said Munns had been caring for the animals on his grandparents' smallholding for six months without incident and was now receiving counselling for his temper.

Chairman of the bench, Patricia Cave, told Munns it had been a sustained attack and she warned him a custody term would be considered seriously.

But after the hearing, Mrs James said she loved her grandson “unconditionally”, despite telling police officers she feared for her life when faced with the teenager's temper.

She called on the court to spare him custody when he is sentenced next month and instead send him for help to control his anger.

Speaking from her smallholding, she told the EADT: “He needs to go on an anger management course - he needs help. His mother has been trying to get help for him since he was 13 or 14 - sometimes he just looses it and he lashes out.

“But he had been here for six months caring for the animals and we trusted him - this is the first time we have seen his anger.

“We were shocked because Floss was such a lovely dog but he is our grandson and we love him unconditionally - we will welcome him back when he has received treatment, a custodial sentence won't do any good.”

The case was adjourned until September 4 for reports on Munns to be drawn up. He was given unconditional bail.

will.clarke@eadt.co.uk

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