Tesco may have to pull down extension

A MAJOR supermarket may have to tear down an “ugly” extension after planners refused retrospective permission for the controversial building.Tesco in Bury St Edmunds was found not to have stuck to plans agreed with St Edmundsbury Borough Council two years ago.

A MAJOR supermarket may have to tear down an “ugly” extension after planners refused retrospective permission for the controversial building.

Tesco in Bury St Edmunds was found not to have stuck to plans agreed with St Edmundsbury Borough Council two years ago.

The development, which includes a cage marshalling area, bulk storage and an extension for the shops deliveries did not match plans laid out in 2005.

Council officers had recommended the authority approve the plan retrospectively but, following objections from neighbours to the supermarket, councillors rejected it.


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Objectors said the building was too big and had inappropriate white cladding instead of the red brick found across the back of the main superstore.

Trevor Beckwith, a member of planning and development control committee, said: “It was dominating the backs of people's gardens.

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“It was blocking the light at certain times of the day but I feel people should be able to enjoy their gardens when they want and not when Tesco's wants them to.

“The building itself is also pretty ugly and I don't see why people should have to look at that.”

Mayor Margaret Charlesworth, who also voted against the Tesco's extension, said: “It wasn't in keeping with its surroundings in either scale or material.

“It is as ugly as you can imagine and it doesn't fit in with anything. Tesco should have been more sensitive - people's gardens should be their own private spaces.”

A spokesman for Tesco said: “We are disappointed by the decision and we are now considering our options.”

A spokeswoman for St Edmundsbury said: “The options are that Tesco could appeal against the decision or comply and remove the unauthorised development, or the committee could look into taking enforcement action.

“If the council serves an enforcement notice and the person the notice has been served on doesn't comply, the first step is to consider prosecution. We do have powers to take further action but these are normally only used in exceptional circumstances.”

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