The tiniest train set in the world

IT may be small, but for model train enthusiasts it doesn't get much more perfectly formed than this.

Russell Claydon

IT may be small, but for model train enthusiasts it doesn't get much more perfectly formed than this.

The tiniest train set in the world - with a 3mm track gauge - has gone on sale in Suffolk.

And it is already building up steam at the Perfect Miniatures store in Sudbury, with the “T-Gauge” sets so small they can even be used inside its dolls houses.


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Replica people and animals for the sets are barely visible and the trains are dwarfed by a 50p piece.

Built in China by a Japanese company, the minute sets are just one tenth of the popular Hornby sets which previous generations still hold much affection for.

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They have magnetic wheels and even have almost microscopic-sized lights in individual carriages.

Peter Hunt, the owner of Perfect Miniatures, said: “It is one 450th scale which is near as damn the scale the architects work to.

“It has lights and everything and it is an extraordinary set-up. One mile is only 11ft and 9ins.

“You could easily build the whole line from Sudbury to Marks Tey in a room. It is completely and entirely ridiculous.”

He added: “We have done very well with them.”

A working model of the set has been constructed in the back of the shop.

T-Gauge (1/450) was introduced at the Tokyo Toy Show in 2006 by Eishindo and went on sale the following year, and has just arrived in the UK.

It is currently the smallest commercial model railway scale in the world.

The first train released is the famous Japanese Series 103 commuter train, which is available in several different liveries.

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