Thief had firearm under his bed

POLICE raided the home of a thief after finding his blood at the scene of a crime - and discovered he had a firearm stored away in his bedroom, a court heard.

POLICE raided the home of a thief after finding his blood at the scene of a crime - and discovered he had a firearm stored away in his bedroom, a court heard.

Carl Loveridge, 29, stole a number of items from a Mercedes Benz car in Brandon on September 22 and 23.

Magistrates in Bury St Edmunds heard how Loveridge, a builder, left his blood at the scene of the break-in, which helped police track him down.

Having used his DNA to trace him to his home in Thetford Road, Brandon, police officers searched the premises, where they found an air rifle and ammunition.


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Despite claiming the gun was his father's, Loveridge admitted one charge of theft and one count of possessing ammunition having previously been detained in prison - former inmates are barred from having any firearms or ammunition within five years of release.

Magistrates ordered Loveridge to carry out 200 hours of community service for each offence to run concurrently, pay £500 in compensation to the car owner and contribute £50 towards the prosecution costs.

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Prosecuting, Ian Devine told how Loveridge had taken a radio, a speed camera detector, and three keys worth £500 and how Loveridge's blood was found among the broken glass on the back seat of the car.

He said: “On October 4, he was arrested in connection with the theft and a search was made of the house.

“During the search an air rifle with ammunition was found in the bedroom which was seized by police. Later at the police station he offered a full no comment interview.”

Philip Williams, for Loveridge, said he had been drunk and on Valium because he was a recovering heroin addict - an addiction he was now free of having spent three months in custody.

Mr Williams added: “The gun wasn't loaded and it was owned and had been purchased by Mr Loveridge's father.

“He doesn't take drugs any more and he says he feels much better. In 1996 he lost his brother in a car accident which was a tremendous shock to the system and since that date his offending has been continual.

“Although he had offended before that time the accident exacerbated his depression and addiction.

“He says he will now return to work and his last violent offence was more than five years ago.”

will.clarke@eadt.co.uk

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