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So cute! Suffolk alpaca herd welcomes a trio of new arrivals

PUBLISHED: 12:00 19 July 2020 | UPDATED: 12:32 19 July 2020

Sally Berry with Imogen, one of the new arrivals in her  Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Sally Berry with Imogen, one of the new arrivals in her Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

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A Suffolk alpaca herd has welcomed three adorable new arrivals.

Imogen, the alpaca cria (baby), pictured with her mother, Connie, in the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYImogen, the alpaca cria (baby), pictured with her mother, Connie, in the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

David and Sally Berry of Middleton, near Saxmundham, are delighted with the newest additions to their Berryfield herd,

Berryfield Iceni, one of the new alpaca arrivals Picture: DAVID BERRY/BERRYFIELD ALPACASBerryfield Iceni, one of the new alpaca arrivals Picture: DAVID BERRY/BERRYFIELD ALPACAS

So far two female and one male baby alpacas, or crias, have been born.

Berryfield Iona with mum Fantasy Picture: DAVID BERRY/BERRYFIELD ALPACASBerryfield Iona with mum Fantasy Picture: DAVID BERRY/BERRYFIELD ALPACAS

First arrival was Imogen, whose mum is Connie, followed by male cria Iceni, son of Buttercup, and then Fantasy gave birth to Iona. All the crias have the herd name, “Berryfield”, at the start of their names.

Sally Berry with Imogen, the alpaca cria, in her  Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYSally Berry with Imogen, the alpaca cria, in her Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

“They are all fine,” Mrs Berry said. “We needed some assistance with the birth of the latest one, Iona, but she is doing fine.

Imogen,one of the new arrivals for the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYImogen,one of the new arrivals for the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

“There are another three to come. We have decided to give them all names beginning with ‘I’ this year.”

Connie, the mother of baby alpaca Imogen. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYConnie, the mother of baby alpaca Imogen. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Mrs Berry added: “Each alpaca has its own personality. We started with four and now have 30, including the latest arrivals.”

Some of the hembra (females) of the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYSome of the hembra (females) of the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Alpacas are usually born during the daytime, and must have their first feed within four hours to ensure they get the right immunity.

David Berry with some of the hembra (females) of the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYDavid Berry with some of the hembra (females) of the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

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The Berryfield herd is not open to the public, but Mrs Berry normally takes a few alpacas to fetes and village shows each year.

Imogen, with her mother, Connie, in the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYImogen, with her mother, Connie, in the Berryfield alpaca herd at Middleton. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

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However, that has not been possible this year because of the coronavirus lockdown.

“We usually have a little stall so that people can see the sort of things that can be made from alpaca fleece, like scarves and hats,” she said.

Alpacas have become increasingly popular over recent years. Mrs Berry said: “The main reason people keep them is for the wool.

“Their fleece is finer, warmer and harder wearing than sheep’s wool. A lot of people who can’t wear sheep’s wool can wear alpaca and they come in a lovely range of colours.”

She added that alpacas can also be used to guard chickens and lambs, and have a loud warning call, but she said: “You have got to get the right alpaca to use as a guard.”

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