Parents brave walk over scorching hot ashes to fundraise for ill son

Regulars at the Thurston pub gave the firewalk a go

Regulars at the Thurston pub gave the firewalk a go - Credit: Jess Coppins

Two parents have raised hundreds of pounds for the care of their son with a walk over scorching hot ashes outside a pub.

Paul and Steph Brooks, whose 12-year-old son Jake has mitochondrial disease, braved the heat as they tip-toed barefoot over 600C ashes at the Fox and Hounds Pub in Thurston.

The firewalk raised about £600 for Jake's new hydrotherapy hoist

The firewalk raised about £600 for Jake's new hydrotherapy hoist - Credit: Jess Coppins

The family, who organised the walk with the Charlie Gard Foundation, raised about £600 in the event to help pay for a hoist for the family's hot tub, which Jake uses for hydrotherapy and pain relief.

The Brooks family have been spent thousands adapting their garden for the youngster, whose condition affects his movement and energy levels.

The temperature of the ash reached about 600C

The temperature of the ash reached about 600C - Credit: Jess Coppins

Mr Brooks estimated another £1,900 will be enough to pay for the new equipment.

He said: "The firewalk was fantastic. It only really hurts if you happen to hit a hotspot — it was a really weird sensation.

"A couple of regulars at the pub even gave it a go.

Paul and Steph Brooks' did the walk in support of their son Jake and the Charlie Gard Foundation

Paul and Steph Brooks' did the walk in support of their son Jake and the Charlie Gard Foundation - Credit: Jess Coppins

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"The money will go a long way for the hoist. It leaves us about £1,900 short, so this was a big chunk of the money.

"Having the hoist would mean so much — it would really cheer him up and give him some exercise. For the best part of a year, he's only used the hot tub a handful of times.

The walkers celebrated after they braved the heat outside the pub

The walkers celebrated after they braved the heat outside the pub - Credit: Jess Coppins

"It's his main form of pain relief."

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