Town's 20mph bid could protect buildings

MOTORISTS could be forced to crawl through a town at only 20mph in a bid to reduce the risk of accidents and stop vibration damaging historic buildings.

By Richard Smith

MOTORISTS could be forced to crawl through a town at only 20mph in a bid to reduce the risk of accidents and stop vibration damaging historic buildings.

Town councillors have become increasingly concerned in recent years about the growing amount of traffic in Woodbridge, speeding by drivers and the risks for shoppers and residents.

Now they are to repeat a request to the county council to consider the implementation of a 20mph speed limit in the central area. This is the fourth time in 11 years that the town council has asked for a lower speed limit.

For pedestrians involved in accidents with traffic, the speed at which they are hit is critical. At 20mph, only one in 20 are killed. Most injuries are slight and three out of 10 suffer no injury. At 30mph, nearly half are killed.

In Woodbridge concerns are often expressed about speeding in Ipswich Road, Quayside and New Street, and younger drivers sometimes create a “racetrack” out of a circuit of the town centre.

Most Read

Chris Walker, town council clerk, said: “We are going to write to the county council to ask them to consider the immediate possibility of a 20mph speed limit in the central area of the town and this area will be defined and consulted upon.

“We have been asking for a 20mph speed limit for years and years and although we do not know if it will reduce the nitrogen dioxide problem we have, the town councillors say it is something that is required. There is great support for this idea.''

The junction at Lime Kiln Quay Road, the Thoroughfare and St John's Street has high levels of nitrogen dioxide due to the increasing amount of traffic waiting in a confined area. The timing of traffic lights has been altered to try to improve traffic flow through the junction.

A spokeswoman for the county council said the council would consider the request if a map could be produced highlighting the relevant area.

“Then we will carry out an assessment, getting accident data, traffic management data and somebody could video the route. This is then taken to the Speed Limit Panel made up of councillors, council officers and the police,” she said.

“They go through the data and it is up to them to make a decision. We always consider every request that comes in because people who live on that road know best.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter