Tragic TV presenter commemorated by BBC

A RISING television star and former Suffolk schoolboy who died tragically one year ago today is to be commemorated by the BBC, it has been announced.Christopher Price, brought up near Bungay and educated in Bury St Edmunds, was just 34 when he was found dead in his London flat one year ago.

A RISING television star and former Suffolk schoolboy who died tragically one year ago today is to be commemorated by the BBC, it has been announced.

Christopher Price, brought up near Bungay and educated in Bury St Edmunds, was just 34 when he was found dead in his London flat one year ago.

Although suicide was initially suspected, he was later found to have succumbed to a rare brain disease, meningoencephalitis.

Yesterday, the BBC announced it was setting up a new traineeship to develop young journalistic talent in his name.


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Colin Hancock, news editor of BBC THREE , said: "Christopher was one of the most talented people any of us have ever worked with, so it is very fitting he will now be associated with developing young journalistic talent for years to come."

Christopher, a former pupil at the Moreton Hall Catholic boarding school in Bury St Edmunds, had been enjoying growing fame as presenter of BBC Choice's quirky showbiz bulletin Liquid News. He had also presented its predecessor, Zero30 on BBC News 24.

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The self-confessed "gay, bald, fat man", had signed a contract worth £280,000 over two years with the BBC. Viewers would most likely have seen a great deal more of him, had his career continued.

Diminutive Australian singer Kylie Minogue said that being interviewed by Christopher was "like a shining light in an otherwise predictable day of promotion".

Other friends spoke of his wit, journalistic integrity, enthusiasm and generosity.

The traineeship in his memory will see one candidate sponsored through a one-year post-graduate journalism training course. The trainee will also be given work placements at BBC THREE News and be mentored by a senior BBC figure.

Robert Nisbet , BBC entertainment correspondent and a close friend of Christopher's, added: "While we still miss him dreadfully, it is comforting to know that his name and legacy will be remembered by those going in to the business he revolutionised."

Christopher was adopted when he was just two days old by Patricia and Clifford Price, of Earsham, near Bungay.

Clifford, then 51, had retired as chief accountant for the Nigerian Ministry of Education. Patricia was 47 and a teacher at All Hallows' convent, Earsham. The couple had two children of their own and had fostered a third, Christopher's big sister Michelle.

Christopher left Suffolk after finishing at Moreton Hall, moving first to Worth Abbey, a sporty Benedictine school in Sussex and then Reading University, to read Italian and politics.

He began his broadcasting career in local radio, moving to Radio Five Live and then to News 24 before joining BBC Choice.

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