Victims march for tougher sentences

FAMILIES whose lives have been turned upside down by some of Suffolk's most recent notorious crimes have demanded tougher sentencing for offenders and more support for victims.

Russell Claydon

FAMILIES whose lives have been turned upside down by some of Suffolk's most recent notorious crimes have demanded tougher sentencing for offenders and more support for victims.

The calls were made at an emotional march through Ipswich on Saturday.

Organiser Denise Askew, who is the great aunt of baby Luigi Askew killed by his father Duncan Mills, said it was to raise public awareness of the raw deal suffered by victims of violent crime.


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She said: “Sentences are too lenient.

“The balance has gone the other way and they are concentrating on the perpetrators rights so much we have forgotten about the detrimental effect on the victim and family.

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“We want life sentences to mean life.”

The 49-year-old said the campaign, organised across the country by Families Fighting for Justice, was also advocating women being able to find out if their partners have any previous history of domestic violence, in a similar scheme to Sarah Payne's Law - which allows parents to find out about convicted paedophiles in their area.

The march started from Russell Road outside Ipswich Crown Court and wound its way via the town centre to the Wolsey Theatre where a minute's silence was held to remember loved ones.

The family of Dawn Walker - who was murdered by Kevin Nunn in Fornham Park, near Bury St Edmunds in 2005 - were also on the march. They said convicted killers should not be allowed to appeal for at least six years.

Kirsty Walker, Dawn's sister, said: “Life should mean life and they should not have any human rights.”

Killer Duncan Mills was convicted of murder and GBH with intent against Samantha Askew at Ipswich Crown Court in February 2008.

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