Video: Sculptor carves out a show-stopping centrepiece of the National Trust’s logo with a chainsaw

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary. - Credit: Gregg Brown

To look at Tim Atkins’ detailed wooden sculptures, it is hard to imagine they have all been created using a tool as brutal as a chainsaw.

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary. - Credit: Gregg Brown

The fine skills of the artist, from Exning near Newmarket, will come under scrutiny at an event at Ickworth Park next month.

He visited the National Trust property in Horringer near Bury St Edmunds this week and spent three days carving a seven foot tall version of the organisation’s emblem – oak leaves with acorns.

He was commissioned to produce the piece to mark the 25th anniversary of Ickworth’s Wood & Craft Fair and it will take centre stage at the event on October 4 and 5. Afterwards, a commemorative plaque will be attached to the sculpture and it will be found a home in the gardens of Ickworth House.

Sue Borges, marketing manager at Ickworth, said the sculpture had been carved from one piece of cedar wood which had come from a tree on the property’s north lawn that was felled earlier this year.

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary

Chainsaw sculptor Tim Atkins creating a piece at Ickworth House for the Wood Fair's 25th Anniversary. - Credit: Gregg Brown

The Wood & Craft Fair began in 1989 following the great storm of 1987, when the estate found it had significant tree damage and an excess of wood to dispose of.

The first sales of wood were held in the empty shell that was the West Wing of Ickworth at the time, but the event rapidly outgrew the space and moved outside.

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Today, the fair has evolved into a full weekend programme attended by many country craft professionals and enthusiasts who come together to demonstrate their skills and sell their crafts. Mr Atkins will be among them this year. He gave up a job as an electronic engineer to carve out a full-time career as a chainsaw sculptor.

Since then, he has entered carving competitions all over the world and his sculptures - the biggest of which was 15ft tall - can be found in numerous parks and public open spaces across the UK.

To see Mr Atkins at work - and the finished National Trust commission - visit the Ickworth Wood & Craft Fair between 10am and 5pm on the Saturday or Sunday.