Villagers welcome 'whiff' ban

VILLAGERS have welcomed the first day of a ban on an infamous “whiff” - but the farmer responsible said he plans to resume rendering poultry waste.Residents in Woolpit, near Bury St Edmunds, hope a High Court injunction, which came into effect on Wednesday against farmer John Clarke's poultry rendering operation on the outskirts of the village, is the end of dispute.

VILLAGERS have welcomed the first day of a ban on an infamous “whiff” - but the farmer responsible said he plans to resume rendering poultry waste.

Residents in Woolpit, near Bury St Edmunds, hope a High Court injunction, which came into effect on Wednesday against farmer John Clarke's poultry rendering operation on the outskirts of the village, is the end of dispute.

But Mr Clarke wants to resume work by applying for a lawful development certificate by proving he has been rendering on the site for 10 years or more.

John Wiley, vice-chairman of Woolpit Parish Council, said: “I haven't smelt anything for a couple of days and long may it last. If it is over there will be a lot of relieved people.”


You may also want to watch:


Peter Spraggs, assistant postmaster at Woolpit Post Office, said: “Last week there was a smell but not recently. People are over the moon because it was horrendous two weeks ago.

“We've had our doors open all day and we haven't smelt anything. It only seemed to smell in certain parts of the village it depends where the wind was blowing.

Most Read

“I spoke to some ladies from the tennis club and they said it was horrible smell. It is difficult to describe what it smells like - you really to smell it for yourself.”

Mr Clarke said: “We are complying with the injunction. But we are applying for a certificate of lawful development.

“I don't see what the problem is - 90% of the people in the village aren't bothered by what we are doing here.

“A lot of people here believe we stopped four years ago - in the past few weeks we have had very few complaints and in three months no complaints at all.”

Mr Clarke defended his business which he said recycled poultry waste into fertiliser - a job, which he said would have to be done in Coventry if he was unable to continue.

He also said he had installed filters, condensers and afterburners to tackle the stench.

John Grayling, environmental health manager for Mid Suffolk District Council, said: “We are in discussions with Mr Clarke about what he can and cannot do - we are monitoring him.

“He has applied for a lawful development certificate and we are coming to a conclusion of a decision on that in a week or so.

“In the meantime Mr Clarke will have to adhere to the injunction and if people have a problem they should report it because Mr Clarke has made an undertaking to the High Court not to cause a public nuisance by odour.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus