Suffolk Show 2018: Visitors put fitness to the test at Sports Village

Ben Hughes giving a demonstration on slacklining at the Suffolk Show Sports Village
Picture: NIC

Ben Hughes giving a demonstration on slacklining at the Suffolk Show Sports Village Picture: NICK BUTCHER - Credit: Nick Butcher

It was pulses racing all round at this year’s Sports Village – with taster sessions in everything from netball and pilates, to golf and athletics.

Jasmin Brooks helps her sister Asha try slacklining at the Suffolk Show Sports Village Picture: N

Jasmin Brooks helps her sister Asha try slacklining at the Suffolk Show Sports Village Picture: NICK BUTCHER - Credit: Nick Butcher

A whole array of activities were on offer at the Suffolk Show Sports Plus area, where people of all ages were encouraged to learn about health and fitness.

As well as a variety of sessions run by the likes of Ipswich Town FC, Suffolk Cricket, Woodbridge Wolves Athletic Club and the Women’s Cycling Tour, the village offered an interactive space full of video games and music – together with calm spaces where sports fans could catch their breath.

And for those keen to learn about health and rehabilitation, Sportsmed East ran a stall promoting sports medicine.

Georgina Hammond’s 9-year-old daughter Edie took part in a fun skipping challenge run by Skip Beatz.

Edie Hammond, 9, skipping at the Suffolk Show Sports Village. Picture: Nick Butcher

Edie Hammond, 9, skipping at the Suffolk Show Sports Village. Picture: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

Ms Hammond, who lives in Haverhill and has been to the Suffolk Show a number of times, said: “I think it’s very important that children get active in any form – fun is a good way to do it.”

Over at the Ru-Slack stall, operations manager Ben Hughes was teaching the tricky art of slacklining.

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He said his company aimed to provide a healthy outlet for young people at risk of offending.

“We all need to test the boundaries of ourselves and our abilities,” he said. “Unless young people have a positive way of outputting that, it naturally leads to anti-social behaviour.”

Sisters Jasmin and Asha Brooks, who were enjoying a turn on the slackline, said it was important that young people got the opportunity to try sport.

18-year-old Jasmin said: “I think exercise is important nowadays to keep people healthy.”

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