Vomiting disease closes hospital wards

FOUR wards at a hospital serving north Suffolk have been closed to new admissions following an outbreak of the winter vomiting bug.New patients are being turned away from the James Paget Hospital at Gorleston as a result of the bug that continues to cause problems for staff.

FOUR wards at a hospital serving north Suffolk have been closed to new admissions following an outbreak of the winter vomiting bug.

New patients are being turned away from the James Paget Hospital at Gorleston as a result of the bug that continues to cause problems for staff.

The ward closures were introduced to help prevent the sickness - known as the norovirus - from spreading.

Hospital visitors could be unwittingly introducing the bug to the hospital and strict new guidelines have been launched.


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Corporate director Elayne Guest said: “Norovirus is acquired from a variety of sources and one of these could be visitors who themselves may be incubating the bug.

“Visitors are asked not to come to the hospital if they have had diarrhoea or vomiting during the past few days.”

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At least two wards at the hospital had been cleared of the infection but the sickness, which mainly affects older people, later returned.

“This makes us think that visitors are to blame and we would be grateful if they would stay away if they are not feeling well themselves to prevent further infection, said Mrs Guest.

Staff at the hospital are making sure the “golden rules” of visiting are strictly adhered to.

These include only allowing two visitors per bed, and visiting only one ward at the hospital. The rules about hand hygiene and not sitting on a bed are also being upheld.

“The trust recognises that patients need visitors and that, especially at this time of year, visitors want to come and see their relatives and friends.

“Taking extra care and keeping to the advice would be very much appreciated,” said Mrs Guest.

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