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Women’s Week: Female readers from Suffolk and Essex reveal their top worries

PUBLISHED: 12:30 16 January 2018 | UPDATED: 11:24 08 January 2020

Women are fearful about the current political climate with the likes of Donald Trump in power in America. Picture: AP PHOTO/ANDREW HARNIK

Women are fearful about the current political climate with the likes of Donald Trump in power in America. Picture: AP PHOTO/ANDREW HARNIK

Feeling safe on the streets, career prospects and retirement plans are among the top concerns for women in Suffolk and Essex, a survey reveals.

The state of education is a concern for women. Picture: GETTY IMAGES/iSTOCKPHOTOThe state of education is a concern for women. Picture: GETTY IMAGES/iSTOCKPHOTO

Reporter Gemma Mitchell asked female readers to share their views about the issues most important to them for the EADT's Women's Week.

Natasha, 24, Kesgrave

The lack of jobs available and the lack of careers available too.

Gemma Grace, 29, Ipswich

Our female readers have money worries. Picture: THINKSTOCKOur female readers have money worries. Picture: THINKSTOCK

Support for women on the autistic spectrum for employment.

Louise, 30, Ipswich

Safety for my children.

Georgia Norton, 23, Colchester

Pollution in our busy towns is a concern for readers. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNPollution in our busy towns is a concern for readers. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Walking alone, infertility, career opportunities, ageing.

Martha Schwager, 66, Felixstowe

National Health Service.

Elma Glasgow, 45, Ipswich

Some women have also expressed concern about the political power in England. Picture: STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PA WIRESome women have also expressed concern about the political power in England. Picture: STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PA WIRE

Financial security and health.

Willa Cromwell, 39, Southwold

Providing for everyone - staff, clients, family, community - in a way that doesn't make them feel it's an effort on my part.

My business' success, resilience and reputation.

Lack of street lighting featured heavily in the survey results. Picture: ARCHANTLack of street lighting featured heavily in the survey results. Picture: ARCHANT

Staying positive and focused, and keeping everyone else in a positive frame of mind, when under onslaught from people, politics, budgets and world events.

Ensuring that I keep myself healthy and fit to be resilient for the work I need to do, with limited time and occasionally flagging energy.

The risks attached to the current political climate.

The urgent need to define what it is to be human, and why it must be cherished, as digital takes on more and more of our work.

The NHS is a cause for concern for some women. Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTOThe NHS is a cause for concern for some women. Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

The rise of taking umbrage and reduction of old-fashioned human kindness in society.

My mother's happiness.

Doing everything I can to support my son's development through childhood into happy and contributory adult life.

My stepdaughter's future, and wishing I'd been able to help her more.

Occasionally remembering that I'm a wife!

Ageing, and seeing it as a positive.

Staying well groomed for more than half an hour before I descend back into scruffiness.

Jo, over 50, Lowestoft

Education, especially the way Suffolk County Council is failing our SEN children, our schools have lower funding than other areas. Mainstream schools being forced to focus on SATs results over mental health and happiness.

Jobs and wages, every company should be aiming to pay the National Living Wage not Minimum Wage. Zero hours contracts should be banned. Protect workers' rights when we come out of Europe. Brexit - the effect on our county, both financially and emotionally as hate crimes rise.

Health - the privatisation of the NHS and how the Tories are killing it and taking us back to Victorian times.

Universal Credit. Leaving vulnerable people without money for six weeks, sanctions for no reason, how it will affect the self-employed.

Rise of the far-right and their hatred. The right-wing media whipping up hysteria.

Katie Mercer, 30, Chelmondiston

Equality.

Becky, 40, Ipswich

My son's future.

Vicky, 44, Bury St Edmunds

Work life balance for working women. We end up having to do the running of the home and work long hours too!

Jill Geaney, 51, Stowmarket

Lack of aspiration in young women. Lack of aspirations for young girls and young ladies by their parents. Lack of gender-specific teaching methods in schools so that neither gender benefits as much as they could.

Margaret, 63, Kesgrave

Having no state pension for another two-and-a-half years, having no job but not being eligible for any benefits.

Lucy Jackson, 44, Glemsford

Little street lighting and what we have is so dim. I don't go out after dark for that reason.

Wendy Black, 58, Polstead

Not having a pension until I am 66 and having enough to have a good retirement.

Megan, 22, Ipswich

My appearance and weight; having enough time to do everything I want to do in life.

Not having a life plan figured out/figuring one out and not being able to stick to it.

Being good enough - in work, friendships, relationships; my health and my families health.

Irene Wragg, 66, Ipswich

Safety, health care, growing old - mobility, money, frailty.

Abi, 31, Barham

Being approached from behind when with my children.

Hazel, 34, Ipswich

I would love to start a family however that will mean taking a pause in my career as a teacher. I can choose to have a family or promotion to have a better wage. It is no coincidence that 90% of management where I work is male. However, with cost of living rising and having received a pay rise of just 1% in the past seven years I can't afford to take that break, as even now it's a struggle month to month. Essentially it's going to be a choice to start a family or survival.

Lynne Mortimer, 62, Ipswich

The way gains made over the last century are being eroded by the acceptance of sex discrimination (against women) in some educational establishments; by forced marriage; by poverty; by low pay; by pension age changes that have unfairly penalised women; by the continuing inequalities that prevail in many parts of the world - not being allowed to drive; being punished for being raped. I am concerned more today than at any time in the last 50 years.

Jenny, 43, Worlingworth

Online objectification of women.

Katy, 33, Ipswich

Money, not having children, work.

Rebecca, 35, Butley

Pay inequalities and cost of child care. It's not worth me working as 95% of my wages will pay for childcare. I'm working in a professional role and am degree qualified. My husband works three hours more a week, earns more and has no professional qualifications.

Tilly, 19, Stanton

Being catcalled/harassed and/or attacked on the street.

Caroline Page, 59, Woodbridge

The future for children - and most particularly my disabled daughter - in a post-Brexit Britain with crippling constraints on the NHS, increasing cuts in social services; and the rising gap between rich and poor.

Charlotte, 32, Kesgrave

Personal safety when out even during the day.

Julie, 56, Mendlesham

Pension issues.

Marie, 39, Ipswich

Health and wellbeing. Family finances and realistic solutions/tips.

Isabella Carr, 53, Langham

The environment, locally and globally - overcrowding of towns/urban growth, traffic and pollution levels.

Kerri, 32, Martlesham

Being able to do it all without cracking up. The career, the kids, the house. It's still all on women but we have to pay half of the bills now too!

Mary, 47, Felixstowe

Trump, inequality, May, period poverty, food banks, Brexit.

Mischa Pearson, 31, Ipswich

Aside of the impending threat of climate change, raising my son well in the current cultural climate and with a total absence of another parent is my biggest challenge. My role is complex and intense and requires commitment, energy and focus. Being a parent is the most important job I will ever undertake, and I'm acutely aware that my son will one day be a man, and how he responds to those around him, particularly his partners and female co-workers, will be vastly affected by the principles I lay out for him in his formative childhood. Teaching equality without hypocrisy has altered a number of my own previously indoctrinated behaviours from my own childhood which only compounds my belief that as a mother, we hold a fundamental responsibility to do the best we can and not just follow a cultural paradigm set up to fail.

Rebecca, 36, Ipswich

Future for my children especially my eldest who has autism. No local appropriate school etc.

Ruth, 41, Bury St Edmunds

Money.

Sarah, 63, Ipswich

My safety on the streets, particularly after dark.

Elizabeth, 61, Ipswich

Walking at night with no street lights and the increase in violence in Ipswich.

Lesley Bensley, 60, Marlesford

Increased inequality between rich and poor, lack of ambition in women moving into IT and science (numbers have gone down since mid-80s), Britain becoming meaner and small minded.

Carrie Coleman, 54, Ipswich

Managing my bills.

Audrey Ludwig, 52, Ipswich

Continued availability of employment opportunities; cost of living; health services; availability of care for elderly parents.


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