Worry as kids buy fake IDs from internet

A WORRYING number of children in a Suffolk town are buying state-of-the-art fake ID cards from the internet in a bid to dupe doorman and get hold of alcohol, police said yesterday.

Dave Gooderham

A WORRYING number of children in a Suffolk town are buying state-of-the-art fake ID cards from the internet in a bid to dupe doorman and get hold of alcohol, police said yesterday.

Officers in Sudbury have launched a crackdown to beat the growing problem in the market town - warning off licences, publicans and nightclub owners to be particularly vigilant.

They say youngsters are attempting to get into pubs and clubs in Sudbury with the fake cards - which come complete with a photograph and holographic image - as well as using the more traditional method of using identification borrowed from legal drinkers.


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Police in Sudbury admitted the issue was “one of the biggest problems in the town” and could lead to greater anti-social behaviour or drink-related violence.

Pc Barry Simpson, who is leading the scheme, said: “We want to crackdown on this problem before it gets even worse. We are committed to reducing crime around the night-time economy and safeguarding youngsters.

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“These people will do anything they can to get into a nightclub and there can be problems related to excess drinking including an increase in anti-social behaviour. The majority of people coming to the town are law-abiding but we need to make it safe for everyone.”

Investigations have found that youngsters were buying fake international driving permits, which included a photograph, from websites selling them as “novelty gifts”.

Pc Simpson, a member of the safer neighbourhood team for Sudbury and Great Cornard, praised the vigilance of door staff and licensees in the town who brought the problem in rising fake ID cards to the attention of the police.

He said: “We are fortunate that the late-night establishments have excellent door staff who are vigilant and check identification on the door. Companies sell these fake IDs under the pretence of a novelty item and this means they are not breaking the law. There is nothing we can do about that.”

Pc Simpson said the rise in fake identification had seen police “reinvigorate” the town's Pubwatch scheme after finding out some landlords had been fooled.

“The problem we have is that these cards look legal to someone who doesn't know what they are looking for,” Pc Simpson said. “We have had a lot of publicans admit that they ask for identification but they only look at the date of birth. As well as this offence, we are finding people are passing on their own legitimate ID to younger friends or siblings who want to get into certain places.

“Every landlord is committed to making Sudbury a nicer and safer place to come and enjoy the night-time economy.”

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