Heart transplant patient: I owe my life to my donor

Yvonne Dunham lived with sudden adult death syndrome before having a heart transplant last year Pict

Yvonne Dunham lived with sudden adult death syndrome before having a heart transplant last year Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan

She was given just two years to live - but now Yvonne Dunham will shown her remarkable turnaround when she takes part in a tough national contest for heart transplant patients.

Mrs Dunham will now compete in the Transplant Games in Newport later in July Picture: SONYA DUNCAN

Mrs Dunham will now compete in the Transplant Games in Newport later in July Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Having twice had her hopes of a life-saving heart transplant dashed, Mrs Dunham - from Fressingfield - believed Sudden Adult Death Syndrome would eventually kill her.

She suffered with breathlessness and heart palpitations since 1989 but was told it was not problem for people her age.

However that all changed in 2016 when the symptoms forced her into retirement and she was told she had just two years to live.

"When I was diagnosed they told me there was nothing else they could do, surgically or medically," she said.

The nurse was diagnosed with hypertophic cardiomyopathy in 1989 Picture: SONYA DUNCAN

The nurse was diagnosed with hypertophic cardiomyopathy in 1989 Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan


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"When you are younger you try not to dwell on it but, as I got worse, I got more concerned.

"It was a huge shock when the doctor told me how long I had to live."

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Hearts were found on two occasions but turned out to be unsuitable for transplants.

It took 13 months of gut-wrenching waiting but she finally had her life-saving surgery in February 2018 - and has even been able to return to work part-time since.

Mrs Dunham, from Fressingfield, hopes more families will make the decision to allow their loved ones

Mrs Dunham, from Fressingfield, hopes more families will make the decision to allow their loved ones organs to be donated after their death Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan

"I know my heart is a responsibilty," she said. "I owe it to my donor to do everything I can every day.

"I think about the family all the time. Their person is constantly with me. I have to be getting better and fitter and make the most of the rest of my years."

To celebrate her new-found health, Mrs Dunham is taking part in the annual Transplant Games - competing in a 3km walk and tenpin bowling competitions alongside more than 1,000 competitors in 23 different sports and events.

"I was never into sports at school, I didn't think I'd end up doing something like this," added Mrs Dunham.

Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS) is a genetic condition with no know cure, which can cause the ele

Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS) is a genetic condition with no know cure, which can cause the electrical impulse controlling the heartbeat to stop working Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan

"But the sports aren't what you might think - they are less physical and let more people take part which is a great thing."

She added: "I can understand why some people wouldn't want to give permission for their love ones organs to be used, why they might think 'oh my god, they're going to cut them up'.

"I'd ask them to think about the person that organ could help. It could give someone a life."

Thanks to her anonymous donor, Mrs Dunham is now "living every day to its fullest" Picture: SONYA DU

Thanks to her anonymous donor, Mrs Dunham is now "living every day to its fullest" Picture: SONYA DUNCAN - Credit: Sonya Duncan

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