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Plans to replace ‘eyesore’ cottage on grounds of Framlingham College find support

PUBLISHED: 08:30 18 January 2016

Framlingham College - Linda Kinsey citizenside.com

Framlingham College - Linda Kinsey citizenside.com

(c) copyright citizenside.com

A redundant building on the grounds of Framlingham College could be demolished and replaced to provide two residential dwellings for staff.

Known as the Wooden House or White Cottage, the building was historically a residential dwelling, however has for many years been unused and has fallen into a state of disrepair.

The application, submitted by the Governors of Framlingham College, seeks to erect a pair of one-bedroom semi-detached dwellings, the size and scale of which will replicate the existing building.

Paul Taylor, headmaster at Framlingham College, said: “The college has been acutely aware of the poor state of the White Cottage for a number of years and, as we have been advised it is beyond repair, we intend to demolish it.

“While it is not a listed building we do consider it to be of historic interest, and so we have spent considerable time consulting with local conservation groups and local residents to ensure that we replace it with a design of house accurately reflecting the original features of this attractive building.

“Our proposal has attracted considerable support from the local community who are delighted that the college is addressing the matter in this way.”

The plans have found support from the community, which in recent decades had initially wanted to see the building restored.

One response submitted onto the council’s planning portal read: “Fifteen years ago, I was publicly antagonistic towards all attempts to replace the Wooden House with a design entirely inappropriate for the conservation area.

“The present proposal is for a useful dwelling which bears some relevance to what has stood on the site for 200 years.”

The Framlingham and District Local History and Preservation Society unanimously agreed that demolishing and rebuilding would be better than attempting to restore the existing building, subject to six conditions including the retention of its chimney pots and the two millstones which are in place as doorsteps to be exposed and retained as an important link to an earlier occupant.

The society said: “The present building is an eyesore on that approach to the town, which could remain for the foreseeable future if permission is not granted. The Station Road approach has been such for many years, and we must avoid repeating that.”

Responding to the application online, Framlingham business owner Bill Bulstrode said: “Having lived and worked in the town for 62 years the

building is now an eyesore on the corner of College/Pembroke Road.

“It needs to be replaced with a similar type building but suitable for the 21st century.”

County councillor Christopher Hudson said: “I shall be promoting this application. I would like to see the building used for homes but want it to remain as close as possible to its external appearance.”

A final decision is due to be made by Suffolk Coastal District Council by February 1.

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