Essex teenager loses meningitis battle

A TALENTED and popular school boy has died following a battle with meningitis.Nigel Bulmore, 17, a pupil at King Edwards Grammar School in Chelmsford, died after eight days in intensive care in hospital.

By Roddy Ashworth

A TALENTED and popular school boy has died following a battle with meningitis.

Nigel Bulmore, 17, a pupil at King Edwards Grammar School in Chelmsford, died after eight days in intensive care in hospital.

The student, who lived in Billericay, had contracted meningococcal meningitis.

The school's headteacher, Dr Michael Walker, said his many friends were devestated by his death.

In a statement, Dr Walker added: “It is with great regret that we record the sad news that Nigel Bulmore, who was a student in Year 12 at King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford (KEGS) passed away on Monday of this week, after eight days in intensive care suffering from meningitis.

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“Our school community is deeply saddened by the loss of such a courteous, gentle and popular young man.

“Nigel was an extremely able and committed student - achieving highly, and always giving of his very best in everything he did here.”

Dr Walker said that Nigel played both football and rugby for the school, and also enjoyed playing the guitar.

He described the teenager as a quiet and thoughtful person within lessons, who could also be the life and soul of the party when socialising with his friends, and added that he had an excellent sense of humour and fun.

“He was much loved by everyone and had many friends throughout his year group. His elder brother also attended this school and is currently at university.

“The school community has been very subdued this week as we have been devastated by this tragic loss and are struggling to come to terms with it.”

Dr Walker added that KEGS is planning to hold a memorial service and celebration of Nigel's life in school next week, with tributes from his close friends.

“We have received expressions of condolence from many students, parents, staff and governors of the school,” he said.

“Nigel and his family are in the thoughts and prayers of all of us at such a sad time.”

Dr Walker added that medical advice received by the school suggested there was little danger of any other student having contracted the strain of the disease that took Nigel's life.

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