Search

Ranking Ipswich Town’s home kits from the last 20 years... as Blues prepare to launch new shirt

PUBLISHED: 12:00 29 June 2020 | UPDATED: 16:19 02 July 2020

Andy Warren has ranked Ipswich Town's kits from worst to first. Picture: ARCHANT

Andy Warren has ranked Ipswich Town's kits from worst to first. Picture: ARCHANT

Archant

Ipswich Town are close to revealing their new home kit for the 2020/21 season. Andy Warren ranks every effort from the last 20 years from worst to first.

Sam Parkin and Ian Westlake model Town's 2005/06 shirt. Picture: ARCHANTSam Parkin and Ian Westlake model Town's 2005/06 shirt. Picture: ARCHANT

15 - 2005/07 - Punch

Punch produced some excellent kits during their run supplying the Blues but this was not one of them.

The swooping beauty contest white sash didn’t work at all, particularly because there was a blue one on the shorts as well. They never lined up and just looked plain odd.

It didn’t fit anybody, athlete or fan, well either and the material wasn’t great.

It’s propping up the pile.

Lee Bowyer, pictured wearing the 2011/12 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: PALee Bowyer, pictured wearing the 2011/12 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: PA

14 - 2011/12 - Mitre

It doesn’t feel like an awful lot of effort went into this particular jersey.

It has the exact main pinstriped body of Town’s shirts between 2007 and 2009 but then bolts on the sleeves of the 2010/11 shirt.

It’s an ok shirt but you want a bit more imagination.

Portsmouth's Jonathan Hogg (left) battles for the ball with Ipswich's Grant Leadbitter during the npower football League Championship match at Portman Road, Ipswich.Portsmouth's Jonathan Hogg (left) battles for the ball with Ipswich's Grant Leadbitter during the npower football League Championship match at Portman Road, Ipswich.

13 - 2009/11 - Mitre

As previously mentioned, this shirt was sampled a year later as its shoulders were stolen and used again.

This shirt’s fine but it’s not inspiring. It feels like plenty of clubs wore this design at the time.

Tom Lawrence in the 2016/17 shirt. Picture: PAGEPIXTom Lawrence in the 2016/17 shirt. Picture: PAGEPIX

12 - 2016/17 - adidas

My least favourite of Town’s new generation of adidas kits.

I don’t like the different coloured blue chevrons (looks like a re-worked version of the Polyfilla logo), I’d prefer adidas stripes to be white and the fact it was worn with blue shorts wasn’t great either.

Toto Nsiala in the 2018/19 Town shirt. Picture: STEVE WALLERToto Nsiala in the 2018/19 Town shirt. Picture: STEVE WALLER

11 - 2018/19 - adidas

This shirt has grown on me significantly.

I have to admit, I wasn’t a fan when it was first launched, mainly due to the red, but it looks so much better in person than it does in pictures.

The Magical Vegas logo is an obvious negative – I doubt that colour scheme would work on any shirt – while the fact it was the jersey worn as the club tumbled towards relegation doesn’t do it any favours either.

Ainsley Maitland Niles, pictured wearing Town's 2015/16 shirt. Picture: STEVE WALLERAinsley Maitland Niles, pictured wearing Town's 2015/16 shirt. Picture: STEVE WALLER

10 - 2015/16 - adidas

Pinstripes, tick. Old-school collar, tick. Blue sleeves, tick.

It’s feels a little like a throwback to the 80s while also fitting in well in the modern era.

A solid effort, but we’ve seen all of these elements before in the not-too-distant past.

Luke Chambers shows off the 2012/13 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: ARCHANTLuke Chambers shows off the 2012/13 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: ARCHANT

9 - 2012/13 - Mitre

Ah, yes. The shirt launched with that wonderful farmyard video.

From memory this shirt split opinion, largely down to the red stripes across the shoulders.

I like it, though, largely because it’s one that sticks out following a few years of shirts which all blend into one.

Ipswich Town.s 2017/18 kit. Picture: STEVE WALLERIpswich Town.s 2017/18 kit. Picture: STEVE WALLER

8 - 2017/18 - adidas

Another clean and simple effort but it works really well for me.

The blue is a good shade (though not quite as silky as the 2019/20 edition) and the adidas stripes down the ribs is a nice touch.

A good, solid ‘v’ collar as well.

Marked down because Birmingham wore almost exactly the same shirt during the 2017/18 season.

Cole Skuse in Town's 2013/14 jersey. Picture: PAGEPIXCole Skuse in Town's 2013/14 jersey. Picture: PAGEPIX

7 - 2013/14 - Mitre

The final Mitre kit was a decent effort (though I had completely forgotten it existed prior to putting this list together) with nods to the Wembley 2000 effort from Punch. That’s never a bad thing.

Maybe a little too much white?

ONE-NIL: Ipswich Town's Marcus Stewart, left, celebrates scoring the opening goal against Leeds United with team-mates Alun Armstrong, centre, and Matt Holland at Portman Road in September 2001ONE-NIL: Ipswich Town's Marcus Stewart, left, celebrates scoring the opening goal against Leeds United with team-mates Alun Armstrong, centre, and Matt Holland at Portman Road in September 2001

6- 2001/03 - Punch

I still stand for this shirt nearly 20 years later.

It’s probably the most simple design on here, with a lone white line separating the sleeves from the body, but that simplicity is something I embrace.

The blue was maybe a little light for some. Not me. I like it.

Town's 2014/15 shirt was a popular edition with fans. Picture: PAGEPIXTown's 2014/15 shirt was a popular edition with fans. Picture: PAGEPIX

5 - 2014/15 - adidas

The Blues’ return to adidas was a triumphant one.

There’s nothing overly special about this shirt but the little black flashes, around the collar and sleeves, are great and give it a touch of class.

It’s clean and simple. A nice shirt which comes with good memories as Town reached the Championship play-offs.

Shefki Kuqi shows off the 2003-05 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: PAGEPIXShefki Kuqi shows off the 2003-05 Ipswich Town shirt. Picture: PAGEPIX

4 - 2003/05 - Punch

It may just be my age, but this shirt only brings back good memories for me.

It’s an incredibly simple design using entirely straight lines, but it did the job as well as the team on the pitch.

The white flashes from the waist up are subtle and the collar simple.

Ipswich Town's shirt from 1999 to 2001 was a real favourite. Picture: PAIpswich Town's shirt from 1999 to 2001 was a real favourite. Picture: PA

3 - 1999/00 - Punch

For many, this will be the undisputed No.1 on this list. I hear you and, in many ways, I agree.

The memories it brings back are stunning. It’s maybe the last truly ‘old school’ Ipswich kit worn by the club and was used during the Blues’ last truly successful period.

So forgive me for only having it third.

Maybe my tastes have changed slightly. Maybe I’ve dropped it down the list to be a little provocative. Who knows?

But is it maybe a little busy? Is there too much red? Has that use of red encouraged too much red in future years?

I’m torn, but it’s staying third.

Kayden Jackson wearing Town's 2019/20 jersey. Picture: STEVE WALLERKayden Jackson wearing Town's 2019/20 jersey. Picture: STEVE WALLER

2 - 2019/20 - adidas

This was supposed to be the kit donned by the Ipswich Town players as they won promotion back to the Championship at the first attempt, possibly winning two Wembley finals along the way.

Alas, that wasn’t to be, but this is still a great kit. For my money the best since the return to adidas in 2014.

The shade of blue is spot on. It’s clean, simple, classy and the darker blue chevrons are subtle yet noticeable. The fact sponsor Magical Vegas agreed to have their colour scheme changed makes this shirt.

It’s just a shame images of it won’t be particularly prominent when it comes to the club’s history.

Jon Walters, wearing the Blues pinstriped shirt worn between 2007 and 2009. Picture: PAJon Walters, wearing the Blues pinstriped shirt worn between 2007 and 2009. Picture: PA

1 - 2007/09 - Mitre

Yes please. This shirt is top of the pile.

The pinstripes are executed perfectly and classically and the round collar helps show them off to the full.

This shirt looked particularly good in the long-sleeved version and with the E-On sponsorship rather than the Marcus Evans logo.

A thing of beauty and a deserved winner.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the East Anglian Daily Times

A Suffolk safari organiser is back on the trail after lockdown. Philip Charles returned from six years working as a bear guide and researcher in British Columbia in Canada to set up Spirit of Suffolk in his home county. But the newly-formed business took a temporary hit when the coronavirus crisis struck. As well as safaris, Phil also runs photography workshops, and produces prints and home-made short books. He is a lecturer at Suffolk New College, teaching wildlife and conservation-based modules on the Suffolk Rural campus in Otley. Through his business, he aims to build a conservation-based economy connecting visitors with Suffolk’s stunning countryside both digitally and physically through safaris and lectures. “I spend most of my time on safari in farmland habitat on the Shotley and Deben peninsulas,” he says. “This guiding season for Spirit of Suffolk started early March and I had several safari bookings as well as two photography workshops planned throughout March and April.” Philip was just one safari into the season – with one urban fox tour under his belt – with the business really taking off when lockdown measures were introduced on March 23, which meant he had to ditch his planned events. Lockdown hit him hard on a personal level too, he admits. “I always thought I would be able to head out to the countryside still, alone, and with caution. But as lockdown measures were introduced I realised this was not to be the case. “On a personal level this was deeply troubling as time spent in nature forms who I am as a person in both actions and spirit. “From a business perspective initially it felt shattering as I could not operate any of the core elements of the business, and to have started the season so spectacularly well with an amazing first safari and superb urban fox tour I really felt bad for the guests that had trips booked and were now not able to take them. “As a wildlife photographer but living in central Ipswich I also felt limited in what I could do photography-wise.” But he picked himself up and started working on his website and social media strategies. It was a “joy” to provide a vital connection with nature to people stuck at home, he said. “Early on in the lockdown I started a project called ‘On the Doorstep’ in which I would spend a little time each day stood on my doorstep and photograph the comings and goings of people.” The project now forms part of a cultural snapshot of Ipswich in 2020 collated by Suffolk Archives. He also used the downtime to create short books. The two titles – Suffolk Wildlife - A Photo Journey, and Spirit Bear - A True Story of Isolation and Survival – have been “very popular”, selling both in the UK and abroad. They even received an accolade from veteran environmentalist and wildlife broadcaster Sir David Attenborough who described them as “delightful”. He has two more planned – the first of which is Bears and Hares, which is set to be followed by a collection of photo stories from the doorstep project. As lockdown eased in early August he was able to resume his safaris, initially on a two-week trial basis. The pilot proved very successful and as a result he was able to begin booking events again. “Although we are nearing the quieter season I continue to take people out who are keen on enjoying the beauty of Suffolk and its wonderful wildlife and I am personally excited for the beauty and joys of autumn,” he says. “People often purchase the safaris as a gift for someone else and this continues to be popular, as a birthday present or Christmas present that can be redeemed at any point in the future.” From October, he is also planning to resume his one-day photography workshops. “I have always loved showing people the wonders of nature, whether that be a grizzly, a barn owl, killer whales or an urban fox. I think the lockdown period offered a different appreciation for the things around us and I am ever so excited to be with people again and to be showing them all the wonderful wildlife of my favourite spots in Suffolk.” He has had to adapt the tours to ensure safety, but the changes are subtle and don’t detract from the main goal - which is seeing nature, he says. “I now encourage the guest to bring along their own drink and snacks and to also bring their own pair of binoculars. We do wear face coverings while in the vehicle and with the windows open to ensure ventilation. Such changes have been well received by the safari guests and we continue to have some great wildlife viewing.” He’ll be “forever grateful” to his customers and guests for their support and understanding during the pandemic. “Recovery all depends on the current status of local restrictions and the virus itself. I am hoping that a vaccine can be in place as soon as possible. As a fledgling business I have felt a hit, although the sales of short books has helped.” But he remains “positive and optimistic”, he says. “The only way is up,” he says. His hope is that Spirit of Suffolk will become a well-known brand. “I have long term goals of buying woodland for conservation and wildlife viewing and also establishing a small lodge where I can accommodate guests for taking multi-day safaris and tours. “For now I am happy to take things slowly and cautiously, testing the waters in certain areas as I continue to grow the brand and products that I provide. “It is exciting. I am so deeply passionate about what I do that I know it will continue to be a success.” Suffolk’s wildlife in spotlight as safaris get back on track