De Vos in new technology call

JASON De Vos has once again called on the introduction of technology to help referees.The Blues skipper has long been an advocate of video replays to help officials make the right decisions and the issue was brought into sharp focus for Ipswich when they were denied a goal, and at least two potential penalty decisions.

Derek Davis

JASON De Vos has once again called on the introduction of technology to help referees.

The Blues skipper has long been an advocate of video replays to help officials make the right decisions and the issue was brought into sharp focus for Ipswich when they were denied a goal, and at least two potential penalty decisions.

De Vos was particularly incensed when it appeared Velice Sumulikoski had bundled the ball over the line before it was knocked back out again by Matthew Connolly's arm.


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Alan Lee felt he should have had two penalties, with the first a clear push on him by Michael Mancienne.

De Vos said: “We had no luck in terms of decisions. We should have had a penalty in the first half and we scored a legitimate goal in the second half - the video shows that.

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“Unfortunately the referees and their assistants don't have the benefit of replays during the match, so we have to lick our wounds and be happy with the point we have.

“In fairness to the linesman he said he could not see it because there were bodies in the way and that is fair enough. If you can't see it you can't give it, but the video shows it was a goal and we feel very hard done by.

“It was an entertaining game from the neutral's perspective, but from our stand point we feel we should have come away with the three points.”

Referee Paul Armstrong denied Town a first half spot-kick for a foul on Lee and explained why to the players.

“The referee didn't feel it was a foul and we have to accept that decision, but it is very clear it was a two-handed shove and that was a goal-denying opportunity. I'm not one to be over-critical of referee because it is a difficult job and not one I would like to do because you are on a hiding to nothing.

“You just hope that over a 46-game season these decisions even themselves out, but I look back and video technology would have helped us out considerably.”

The Canadian can't understand why FIFA has ended the experiment of goalline technology, but would not stop with just cameras in the area.

He said: “I would like to see videos not just on the goal-line, but there are other decisions on the pitch where it would help.

“I don't buy into the argument that it takes too long and disrupts the flow of the game because I have worked in the media and I know how quickly it can be done.

“It would greatly benefit the game and make the referee's job much easier. You see it in other sports and where there is any contention they go to a video replay and it gets cleared up right away.

“That would also alleviate the frustration felt by players, which is understandable because there is a lot riding on those decisions.”

De Vos has tried to introduce a rule at Ipswich where only he approaches the referee, but accepted that players' emotions sometimes run away with them.

He added: “We do need to get our own house in order. I have spoken to our players about trying to calm down during the game because the referee is not going to change his mind because you are screaming at him. It does not look good and sets a bad example to the kids coming through the game as well.

“The referee is there to do a job and we should help him all we can and video technology will make their jobs easier.”

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