Last pair frustrate Suffolk's bowlers

SUFFOLK let Cambridgeshire off the hook, but still ended the first day of their three-day Minor Counties Championship game at March in a good position.

SUFFOLK let Cambridgeshire off the hook, but still ended the first day of their three-day Minor Counties Championship game at March in a good position.

Needing a win to maintain a realistic chance of retaining their Eastern Division title, Suffolk looked on course for a comfortable success when the home side were 108 for seven after 30 overs at lunch.

But a 10th-wicket stand of 88 saw Cambridgeshire post a score on 246 - with Suffolk gaining a maximum four bowling points.

Andrew McGarry was the main danger, bowling well and deserving his six wickets, with Justin Bishop taking four good close-to-the-wicket catches.


You may also want to watch:


Phil Caley won the toss for Suffolk and put Cambs in to bat. The start was delayed for an hour because of wet conditions, and lunch was taken early when a shower arrived.

At 158 for nine Suffolk were hoping to wrap up the Cambs innings for less than 200. But the last pair put paid to that before Paul King had Adam Syddall caught at slip.

Most Read

When Suffolk batted they were rocking slightly at 58 for four, but then Chris Schofield and Chris Warn steadied the ship before play ended 13 overs before the maximum 110.

By 7pm the sun had become a hazard at a ground that has a wicket that goes east to west. Not only were the batsmen having trouble, but the bowlers were also struggling to see when delivering.

Kesgrave-based Clacton batsman Martyn Cull made four on his Minor Counties debut as the Suffolk top order failed to find their touch.

Suffolk director of cricket Kevin Brooks said: “Cambridgeshire scored more than we hoped they would at lunch, but before the start we would have settled for getting them out for 246.

“Andrew McGarry bowled a long stint and did well, and with 58 overs still to bat with the right application we can reach 325 and collect maximum batting points.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter