Nokimoves continues remarkable run

NOKIMOVER, the horse that brought Alex Vaughan-Jones the National Novice Point-to-Point Jockeys Championship in 2006, continued his remarkable run since coming into the ownership of Alex's mother, Alice, when winning the Waveney Harriers Volkswagen Touareg Men's Open at Higham yesterday, writes James Crispe.

NOKIMOVER, the horse that brought Alex Vaughan-Jones the National Novice Point-to-Point Jockeys Championship in 2006, continued his remarkable run since coming into the ownership of Alex's mother, Alice, when winning the Waveney Harriers Volkswagen Touareg Men's Open at Higham yesterday, writes James Crispe.

Ridden with some panache by Alex, who works in London as a property surveyor, Nokimover hit the front at the second last and stayed on strongly to beat Benrajah by threequarters of a length.

Alice, from Wells-next-the-Sea in north Norfolk, owns the Scallywag gelding in partnership with her local feed merchant, Gary Luck. She said: “What this horse has done since he joined us beggars belief.”

He was a first winner as a trainer for Northamptonshire handler Gerald Bailey, who has recently taken over the licence from his wife, Caroline. Alice also revealed: “Nokimover is very difficult - he refuses to live in a box, so is kept in an outside yard, and never goes anywhere with the rest of the string as he likes to do his own thing.”


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In a day of training firsts, much the fastest time was recorded in the Ladies' Open by Waking Ned, who had ventured all the way from Castleton on the North Yorkshire moors.

Winning trainer Philip Kirby, who left home at 4am, revealed: “I only had my first ever runner half-an-hour ago, with Benrajah, and he was the one we really fancied. This one only came for the trip out to give him some company.”

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Remarkably, Waking Ned was not even the furthest-travelled winner of the day. That honour went to Minouchka, who barely broke sweat in landing the Restricted Race, and is trained near Hawick, in Scotland, by Philippa Shirley-Beavan.

“It will take us seven-and-a-half hours to get home,” admitted Shirley-Beavan, after her horse had landed a first prize of a paltry £100.

Closer to home, Quid Pro Quo and Instant Appeal produced inaugural victories for trainers Terry Hind and Ruth Edwards.

Quid Pro Quo prevailed after a thrilling finish to the Confined Race, scoring by half-a-length and a length from Resplendent Star and Gatchou Mans. In truth he was only a first pointing winner for Hind, who has taken on the training responsibility for North Weald owner Derek Harding-Jones and had previously enjoyed victories under rules.

Instant Appeal has been an instant star for Edwards, who is engaged to winning pilot Andrew Pennock and has a yard in Royston, Hertfordshire. He proved way too strong for Kaddasan in the first division of the Maiden.

The other Maiden went to Henry's Luck Penny, who survived almost being knocked out of the contest by a loose horse at the final fence to score by the narrowest of margins. Trained in Northamptonshire by Jenny Pidgeon, Henry's Luck Penny was ridden by Newmarket auctioneer Harry Fowler.

Another Northants raider, Court Adjourn, made a brilliant reappearance after a two-year injury absence to lift the Intermediate Race under Stuart Morris.

And the opening Hunt race went for a seventh time to a horse running in the colours of meeting secretary John Whyte, who lives at Ilketshall St Andrew, near Bungay. The horse in question was Supreme Sir, ridden by Andrew Braithwaite, who came home five lengths clear of No Nay Never.

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