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Can you guess these former World Cup stadiums from the air?

The Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia. Photo: Nick Potts/PA Wire

The Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia. Photo: Nick Potts/PA Wire

PA Archive/PA Images

Seven stadiums from World Cup history - from the air. How many can you identify correctly?

Russia is hosting its first World Cup this summer, using 12 stadiums across 11 cities to stage 64 matches. As we ask you to test your memory of World Cup stadiums from previous tournaments, we also take a look at this summer’s venues.

Ekaterinburg Arena (Capacity: 35,000)

The most easterly city hosting matches, situated at the foot of the Ural mountains, and the city where members of the royal family were executed following the October 1917 revolution. The stadium is home to FC Ural, and was initially built in 1953.

Kaliningrad Stadium (Capacity: 35,000)

The most westerly city to stage games. Situated on the Baltic coast, it remains an important Russian seaport. The stadium has been built for the finals, but will be home to FC Baltika Kaliningrad.

Kazan Arena (Capacity: 45,000)

Kazan is the capital of the republic of Tatarstan and is home to 1.2 million people. The stadium was built for the World University Games in 2013 and is home to local club Rubin Kazan. It was designed by the same firm of architects behind Wembley Stadium and the Emirates Stadium.

Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow (Capacity: 80,000)

The main venue for the finals will host the first and last match. Built in the 1950s, it was used during the 1980 Olympic Games and hosts most matches played by the Russian national team and at various times has been home to city clubs Spartak, CSKA and Torpedo. Manchester United fans will remember it fondly - it was here that the club won their third European title by beating Chelsea on penalties in 2008.

Spartak Stadium, Moscow (Capacity: 45,000)

Home, as the name suggests, to Spartak Moscow, who despite their reputation and huge fan base had never truly had a stadium to call their own until it was built. Opened in 2014, it will have a residential area built around it after the finals.

Nizhny Novgorod Stadium (Capacity: 45,000)

Built on hills overlooking the Volga river, Nizhny Novgorod has been a key commercial city since the 19th century. One of the new constructions, it will be home to Olympiets Nizhny Novgorod.

Rostov Arena (Capacity: 45,000)

Rostiv is an historic city famed for its showcasing of Cossack culture, sitting on the banks of the Don river 1,000 kilometres to the south-east of Moscow. FC Rostov will move in once the tournament is finished.

St Petersburg Stadium (Capacity: 67,000)

The old imperial capital can probably lay claim to having the secondary venue at the tournament, as the stadium hosts some big games including what could be a make-or-break second match for the hosts. It will also host three group matches at the pan-European Euro 2020 finals, as well as one Euro quarter-final, and is the home of Zenit St Petersburg.

Samara Arena (Capacity: 45,000)

Capital of the Samara region and home to the offices of Russian state when they were evacuated from Moscow during the Second World War. The dome-shaped stadium will play host to Krylya Sovetov after the tournament.

Mordovia Arena, Saransk (Capacity: 44,000)

The capital of the Mordovia region has a population of just over 300,000. The stadium will be reduced to 25,000 capacity after the tournament, with the space being freed up for other indoor sports on the same complex. It will, though, be home to FC Mordovia.

Fisht Stadium, Sochi (Capacity: 48,000)

The resort city on the edge of the Black Sea hosted the 2014 Winter Olympics, and the Fisht Stadium was purpose-built for those Games. It is due to be a training - and match - venue for the Russia national team after the 2018 finals.

Volgograd Arena (Capacity: 45,000)

The city formerly known as Stalingrad, site of one of World War Two’s most pivotal battles, is now an industrial hub home to one million inhabitants. The stadium is built on the site of the old Central ground and will house FC Rotor once the finals are over.

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