Recipe: 5 impressive iced desserts and lollies to make at home

Carrot cake ice cream served in a flower pot with flowers

Serve up our carrot cake ice cream in a clean flower pot - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Of all the gadgets I own, the most coveted is my Gaggia Gelateria. While she (yes, I’ve assigned her a gender) sits in the cupboard staring up forlornly at me most of the year, the Gaggia comes into her own around May-time, being used to make everything from rhubarb and thyme granita, to boozy slushy drinks, fancy iced coffees and gelatos. Is she expensive? Yes. The model I have will set you back just over £300. But if you like to make your own ice cream on a regular basis it’s worth it. Just 20 minutes after flicking the switch, she’s ready to go. You can be eating your own ice cream or sorbet in an hour. 

If you don’t own an ice cream machine (of any variety), these recipes can be made by freezing the mixture (in as deep a tub as possible so there is very little surface area) and popping into a food processor quickly to blitz after four hours before returning to the freezer. Alternatively, break up with a fork every couple of hours. 

A few notes: 

  1. Freeze your egg whites in batches of two in bags – and you’re ready to make souffles or meringues. 

  1. Be sure to wash your saucepan before adding the ice cream mixture back in the final part of the mixing process – otherwise the residual milk/cream will burn and curdle at the bottom. 


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  1. Always fully cool the ice cream before churning (I suggest pouring into a shallow dish). This will help it come together quicker. 

  1. Don’t despair if your ice cream curdles. Pass it through a sieve. 

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Carrot cake ice cream pots 

(Makes 8) 

This is a riff on a classic brown bread ice cream. Infused with orange zest, cinnamon and caramelised carrot cake, it is rather dreamy. Ginger cake or parkin would work well too. 

For a really cute dessert, do as I did, and serve in flowerpots. I bought a set of 10 spade-shaped teaspoons for £12 online for a touch of final whimsy.  

Ingredients 

For the inclusion: 

150g carrot cake, broken into small crumbs 

2tbsps unsalted butter, melted 

50g caster sugar 

For the ice cream: 

Juice and zest of three large oranges 

1tsp orange extract 

4 large egg yolks 

1tbsp cornflour 

100g caster sugar 

1/2tsp ground cinnamon 

300ml milk 

300ml double cream 

Method 

Combine the butter, cake crumbs and sugar. Place on a lined tray and bake at 180C for 15 to 20 minutes. Leave to cool and crush. 

Place the orange zest and juice, extract, cornflour, cinnamon, egg yolks and sugar in a bowl and mix. Warm the cream and milk in a pan. Gradually whisk the cream mix into the egg mix. Return to the pan and heat gently, stirring all the time, until thick. Churn using your preferred method. Before fully frozen (or once finished in the ice cream machine) stir in the cooled cake crumbs. 

Lemon meringue baked Alaska pies

Lemon meringue baked Alaska pies - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Lemon and ginger Alaska pies 

(Makes 12) 

A pretty cool (sorry, I couldn’t resist the pun) and elegant dessert to serve after a summer barbecue. The bases can be made way in advance, wrapped and frozen, just needing a final flourish with the Italian meringue topping before eating. You can play about with the flavours. Use a different curd in the base – passionfruit or raspberry would be lovely – maybe use Hob Nobs or coconut biscuits for the crunchy bottom. They are incredibly refreshing. 

Ingredients 

For the base: 

250g crushed ginger nut or Hob Nob biscuits 

100g unsalted butter, melted 

Lemon curd 

For the ice cream: 

3 egg yolks 

100g caster sugar 

Zest and juice of three large lemons 

1tsp lemon extract 

250ml milk 

250ml double cream 

For the meringue: 

100g caster sugar 

30ml water 

2 large egg whites 

Method 

Make the base. Mix together the crushed biscuits and butter. Line a cupcake tin with cases and equally divide the mixture. Press into the cases and push it up the sides so you have a dip in the middle. Add a scant tablespoon of curd to each. Set aside. 

Now make your ice cream. Whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, lemon juice and zest and lemon extract in a bowl. Add the cream and milk to a small pan and heat, without boiling. Add a little of the cream to the egg mix and beat. Then a little more. Keep going until it’s all mixed in (don’t be tempted to add it all in one go – it will curdle). 

Return to the pan and bring to a simmer, stirring constantly until creamy and thick like custard. Allow to cool to room temperature and churn. 

Divide between the cupcake cases and pop the tray in the freezer. You can remove the bases and wrap them individually once fully frozen. 

To serve, make the meringue. Pop the egg whites in a large, spotlessly clean bowl (I run a piece of kitchen roll around the bowl with white wine vinegar).  

Place the sugar and water in a pan and warm on a low heat until the sugar begins to melt. Do not stir. Brush any sugar crystals from the outside of the pan with a wet pastry brush. Putting a lid on will create condensation and make it less likely your sugar will crystallise. 

Once all the sugar has melted, bring up the heat to 121C on a sugar thermometer. Whisk the egg whites to slacken and carefully pour over the hot sugar in a stream, whisking constantly – you might want to get someone to help you. 

Whisk until thick and cool. Pipe over your frozen bases and flame with a blowtorch to colour. 

Serve straight away. 

Iced chocolate fudge brownie truffles

Iced chocolate fudge brownie truffles - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Fudge brownie choc ice truffles 

(Makes around 20) 

A little bit of fun. Finish them with your favourite chocolate, and go wild with the decorations. Sprinkles and Co online have a huge range of pretty edibles to adorn your choc ices with.  

Ingredients 

For the ice cream: 

4 egg yolks 

1tbsp cocoa 

100g dark brown sugar 

100g dark chocolate (at least 60-70% 

300ml milk 

300ml double cream 

For the sauce: 

100ml single cream 

1tbsp golden syrup 

1tbsp treacle 

100g dark chocolate 

To finish: 

600g melted chocolate of choice 

Sprinkles/chopped nuts, vermicelli 

150g chopped brownies 

Method 

In a bowl mix the egg yolks, cocoa and brown sugar and break in the dark chocolate. Warm the milk and cream in a pan and add, gradually and in batches, to the egg yolk mix to combine. 

Return the mix to the pan and heat gently, stirring all the time, until thick. Leave to cool. 

To make the sauce combine all the ingredients in a pan on a low heat to melt. Leave to cool. 

Churn using your preferred method. Once the ice cream is nearly set (or once churned in the machine) stir through the brownie pieces and swirl in the sauce. Freeze for 30 minutes (after making in a machine, or two hours using another method). 

Now pour into a lined 1lb loaf tin or 20cm square tin. 

Freeze four around four hours until solid. Using a hot knife cut into equal pieces. Return these to the freezer to freeze solid again. 

Melt your chocolate and bring to room temperature – it must not be hot. 

Dip your frozen ice cream pieces and return to the freezer once more. While in the freezer sprinkle over your decorations. 

Bakewell tart lollies 

Bakewell tart lollies - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Bakewell tart lollies 

(Makes 8) 

All the flavours of the Derbyshire special in a lolly. Leave out the booze if you need to. 

Ingredients 

For the top: 

60g caster sugar 

1tsp vanilla extract 

1/2tsp almond extract 

2 egg yolks 

150ml double cream 

150ml milk 

2tbsps finely chopped, seeded fresh cherries (or tinned) 

For the base: 

300ml cherry juice (I used Cherry Good) 

2tbsps Kirsch 

Method 

Mix together the egg yolks, extracts and sugar. Warm the milk and cream in a pan. Add to the egg yolk mix gradually. Pour into lolly moulds. Sprinkle over the cherries. Pop in the freezer for a couple of hours. 

Combine the cherry juice and Kirsch and add equally to each mould. Place on the tops and push through the lolly sticks. Freeze for about three to four hours. Dip in warm water for a few seconds to help them release. 

A tower of profiteroles with chocolate sauce and flowers

Impress your guests with a tower of caffe latte profiteroles drenched in chocolate sauce - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Caffe latte and rum profiteroles 

(Feeds 4 to 6) 

You can make these in advance and keep them in the freezer to eat one by one as an indulgent pud – or form into a decadent tower, pouring over lashings of chocolate sauce. Serve straight away. 

Ingredients 

For the ice cream: 

4 egg yolks 

100g caster sugar 

50ml dark rum 

1tbsp instant coffee granules 

300ml double cream 

300ml milk 

For the profiteroles: 

125g water 

125g milk 

100g unsalted butter 

150g strong plain white flour 

Pinch salt 

Pinch sugar 

4-5 large eggs, beaten 

Method 

Make the profiteroles. Pre-heat the oven to 220C for at least 20 minutes before baking. Melt the butter, water and milk together on a low heat. Once the butter is melted bring up to the boil. Turn off the heat and sieve in the flour. Add the sugar and salt. Beat until the mix comes away from the side in a ball. Spoon the mix onto a plate and spread out to cool. You want it to be still slightly warm but not hot – which will set the eggs and stop them puffing up the mix. Place into a bowl. Gradually whisk in the egg – you might not need all of it. The mix should have a soft, dropping consistency. Dollop heaped tablespoons of mixture onto lined baking sheets. They should be about 5cm big. 

Turn the oven down to 200C. Only put one tray in the oven at a time. Bake for 25 minutes. Remove. Poke a hole in the bottom of each. Return to the oven for five minutes to crisp up. Allow to cool on racks. 

For the ice cream combine the egg yolks, sugar, rum and coffee in a bowl. Warm the milk and cream in a pan. Gradually add to the egg yolk mix to combine. Return to the pan and cook gently, stirring all the time, until thick. Cool then churn using your preferred method. Pop in the freezer for an hour. Spoon into your profiteroles then wrap and freeze them until you want to serve. 


















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