Gallery/poll: Elbow’s headline performance was unforgettable experience for festival-goers at Latitude 2012

Guy Garvey, lead singer from Elbow, who headlined the main stage on Saturday evening

Guy Garvey, lead singer from Elbow, who headlined the main stage on Saturday evening - Credit: Ashley Pickering

In the absence of Glastonbury last summer, Latitude was the place to be.

Anticipation for the seventh, and perhaps most varied assembly of bands, artists and performers, began to mount back in March, following the announcement of headliners Elbow, Bon Iver and Paul Weller.

And by the time the festival got underway in July, excitement was at fever pitch.

A near-capacity crowd of more than 30,000 thronged Henham Park’s assorted stages and arenas to enjoy a programme of entertainment as eclectic as the weather was last year.

Musically, Elbow surpassed all expectations, ending the goose bumps with spectacular fireworks, Guy Garvey’s rousing set was sandwiched between a hauntingly beautiful performance from Bon Iver and the God of Mod, Paul Weller. The Sunday lunchtime slot was filled by Rufus Wainwright and his Band, a fitting way to spend the afternoon.


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Musically, Elbow surpassed all expectations, and our reviewer wrote: “Although many enjoyed Paolo Nutini headlining Latitude’s main stage last year, for some it felt like a bit of a lightweight act for the festival’s climax.

“Elbow - not just Guy Garvey’s booming, soaring vocal - carry more gravitas and they didn’t disappoint the thousands that turned out to see them at the Obelisk Arena.

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“You just get so much more with Elbow - a strings section; good performer-audience banter; and fireworks. Why Elbow even had an extension from the stage - a 30ft intrusion into the crowd - which Garvey hailed as his ‘vanity thrust’.”

The Sunday lunchtime slot was filled by Rufus Wainwright and his Band, a fitting way to spend the afternoon.

Comedy heroes in the form of Jack Dee, Tim Minchin, Reginald D. Hunter, Rich Hall and Russell Kane shocked, delighted and enthralled the fans.

An extra bridge made moving around the woodland site much easier, although the mud – a consequence of last July’s miserable wet weather – did slow the pace down around some parts of the arena and camping area.

But a small army of stewards armed with woodchips helped keep much of the mud at bay and festival-goers seem well-prepared for the conditions.

Last year Melvin Benn, the man who created latitude, said: “We’d like to extend a special thank-you to all the riders from the Tour de Latitude.

“Over 100 intrepid cyclists, who travelled to the festival in the environmentally-friendly way, had a great day, and have so far raised nearly £14,500 for charity, with proceeds going to Kenyan Orphan Project and Julie’s Bicycle. It’s all shaping up to be the best Latitude yet.”

The bike scheme is being extended this year.

Last year a ticket, including camping and parking, cost £175.

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