So, what is it?

WHAT it is, is a somewhat shambolic Irishman ambling on stage, making several hundred people laugh for an hour or so, and ambling off again; that's what it is.

Dominic Castle

Dylan Moran

What it is

Corn Exchange, Ipswich


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WHAT it is, is a somewhat shambolic Irishman ambling on stage, making several hundred people laugh for an hour or so, and ambling off again; that's what it is.

There's a bit more to it than that, clearly, for example God, or the Death of God to be precise and the emergence of Barack Obama as a kind of super-Jesus.

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Blasphemous? Possibly, but as Christians are members of a generally tolerant religion not the worst thing in the world. No, that would be what Moran might do in the confessional box, given half a chance. Who'd be a priest?

He has an interesting stylistic approach. He is not afraid of silence and frequently left the air still enough for the audience to catch their collective breath, wondering if he'd forgotten his lines.

He actually did appear to do that a few times, allowing a story to trail off into nothingness, though whether because he'd really forgotten what he was saying or had just lost interest was difficult to tell.

Moran is a linguistic gymnast, spinning pretty patterns with his absurdist and random descriptions, his verbal dexterity covering for a fairly straightforward list of comedy standards; religion, national stereotypes, the sayings of children, relationships. In short, nothing too challenging.

Rather oddly he munched his way through a decent chunk of Whole Nut chocolate at the start of the second part. Isn't that what intervals are for? It made him a little difficult to understand at times.

Part of his schtick seemed to be an apparent reluctance to actually be on stage at all, responding to an audience question with "What are you trying to do, tickle another sentence out of me?"

And after another sentence had been tickled out of him he wandered away, leaving a sense that you'd watched, to use sporting parlance, someone playing very much within himself.

Dominic Castle

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