Things to see and do across Suffolk and Essex over the next seven days

Big Girls Don't Cry, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 21. Photo: Contributed

Big Girls Don't Cry, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 21. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

There’s so much going on across Suffolk and Essex over the next seven days. Here are some ideas for things to do over the weekend and beyond.

The Goblin King, The Cut, Halesworth, April 23. Photo: Contributed

The Goblin King, The Cut, Halesworth, April 23. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

The Matt Monro Story - One Voice, Westcliff Theatre, Clacton, April 21, 7.30pm

Matt Monro Jr pays tribute to his legendary father via his songs, video clips and home movies. One of the world’s biggest selling artists of all time, he was dubbed the singer’s singer; clocking up 100million record sales in his lifetime. He was the first to sing on a James Bond film (From Russia With Love) and he contributed the score to The Italian Job.

Big Girls Don’t Cry, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 21, 7.30pm

The Matt Monro Story - One Voice, Westcliff Theatre, Clacton, April 21. Photo: Jodi Photography

The Matt Monro Story - One Voice, Westcliff Theatre, Clacton, April 21. Photo: Jodi Photography - Credit: Archant

Celebrate the music of four ordinary guys from New Jersey who changed the musical world as we knew it via hits including Sherry, December 1963 (Oh What a Night), Walk Like a Man, Rag Doll and Big Girls Don’t Cry.


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Bang Said The Gun, Colchester Arts Centre, Colchester, April 21, 7.30pm

Described as poetry for people who don’t like poetry, the gang behind the best poetry night in the UK according to the Times throw out all the rules. A rollercoaster of emotions, it’s loud, raucous, political, trivial, serious and very funny; featuring a mix of the best and freshest talent. Tomorrow’s show features guests Molly Naylor and Hollie McNish.

Jimmy Carr - The Best Of, Ultimate, Gold Greatest Hits Tour, The Spa Pavilion, Felixstowe, April 22.

Jimmy Carr - The Best Of, Ultimate, Gold Greatest Hits Tour, The Spa Pavilion, Felixstowe, April 22. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

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See How They Run, Seagull Theatre, Lowestoft, April 21, 7.30pm

Open Space Theatre Company stage the classic Philip King farce that sees an escaped prisoner of war, a jealous spinster, a handsome actor and a visiting bishop team up to expose infidelity in an English village preparing for a Nazi invasion. On April 22, 7.30pm, you’re invited to Come to the Cabaret, an evening of classics from the musicals in aid of the Seagull’s Raise the Roof Appeal. On April 23, 7.30pm, Rogues Chorus Shanty Choir present Shanties, Sails and Smugglers’ Tales. It’s a celebration of Lowestoft’s bygone seafaring communities that will bring the fascinating history of the town alive.

God of Carnage, The Assembly Rooms, Dedham, April 26-29. Photo: Contributed

God of Carnage, The Assembly Rooms, Dedham, April 26-29. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

Theo Travis, Stoke-by-Nayland Hotel, Leavenheath, April 21, 8pm

Fleece Jazz welcomes back the multi reedsman on saxes and flute, who is joined by the rest of the Double Talk Quartet. The bluesy, progressive jazz of the quartet draws heavily on the soulful Hammond organ of Pete Whittaker, the soaring guitar of Mike Outram and the powerful but subtle drums and percussion of Nic France.

That’ll Be The Day, Marina Theatre, Lowestoft, April 21, 7.30pm

Bang Said The Gun, Colchester Arts Centre, Colchester, April 21. Photo: Contributed

Bang Said The Gun, Colchester Arts Centre, Colchester, April 21. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

The popular rock‘n’roll variety spectacular returns, featuring a line up of knock-out hits from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, plus some side-splitting comedy.

From The Jam, Aquarium, Wellington Esplanade, Lowestoft, April 21, 7.30pm

Bruce Foxton and Paul Weller originally formed The Jam in 1972. Here Foxton, Russell Hastings (guitar-vocals) and band will be playing the hits like Down In The Tube Station At Midnight, Going Underground, Town Called Malice and The Modern World, alongside rare B sides.

St George’s Day Gala of Light Music, St Peter’s, Sudbury, April 23. Photo: Contributed

St Georges Day Gala of Light Music, St Peters, Sudbury, April 23. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

Sara Pascoe, Palace Theatre, Southend, April 22, 7.30pm

After publishing a book exploring the evolution of the female body, Sara’s new stand-up show Animal sees her consider further issues- will pornography lead to our extinction? Are humans naturally bad? How do we become better? Do we really have to die? and gulp, should she have a baby? An honest and unflinching look at sexuality, empathy, art and God. If that sounds a bit weighty, there will also be material about selfies, glow worms and Ru Paul’s Drag Race.

As You Like It / Bury Fair, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 26-27 / April 28-29. Photo: Contri

As You Like It / Bury Fair, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 26-27 / April 28-29. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

Jimmy Carr - The Best Of, Ultimate, Gold Greatest Hits Tour, The Spa Pavilion, Felixstowe, April 22, 8pm.

An award-winning stand-up for a decade and a half, he’s performed nine sell-out tours, playing nearly 2,000 shows to more than two million people across four continents. Ray Anderson, director of the Spa, said: “We’re delighted to welcome back Jimmy Carr following our sold out and exclusive sneak preview of this tour early last year. This show is a hilarious selection of his very best jokes along with brand new material.”

Belly Dancing Workshop, The Sentinel Gallery, The Sentinel, Wivenhoe, April 22, 6pm

Violinist Tasmin Little, The Apex, Bury St Edmunds, April 25. Photo: Contributed

Violinist Tasmin Little, The Apex, Bury St Edmunds, April 25. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

Professional belly dancer Kloe Rumsey has studied Egyptian belly dancing for 10 years. The evening includes a short performance alongside an interactive workshop on body movement and muscle isolation.

East Anglian Game and Country Fair, Euston Estate, Thetford, April 22-23, 8am-6pm

The hugely popular annual rural showcase includes fun for the whole family with clay shooting, dogs shows, fly fishing, archery, children’s activities, shopping and more.

Omid Djalili - Schmuck for a Night, Ipswich Regent, April 24. Photo: Contributed

Omid Djalili - Schmuck for a Night, Ipswich Regent, April 24. Photo: Contributed - Credit: Archant

Young Artist’s Show, Halesworth Gallery, April 22-23, 11am-5pm Saturday and 11am-4pm Sunday.

Work by local young people, schools, Scout, Guide and Brownie groups who have responded to a botanical theme celebrating the bicentenary of Joseph Dalton Hooker.

Professor Robert Winston, Mercury Theatre, Colchester, April 25. Photo: Clifford Hicks

Professor Robert Winston, Mercury Theatre, Colchester, April 25. Photo: Clifford Hicks - Credit: Clifford Hicks

Tangomotion, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 22, 7.30pm

Four world class tango dancers preform traditional tango to the sounds of 1930s Buenos Aires and the powerful Nuevo Tango music of Astor Piazzolla. Live music comes from the acclaimed tango quartet, Tango Siempre. All have appeared in the hit West End show Midnight Tango, BBC Strictly Come Dancing, Sally Potter’s Covent Garden production of Carmen and Madonna’s film Evita. There’s a free dance class in he Greene Room bar from 6pm-7pm.

The Goblin King, The Cut, Halesworth, April 23, drama workshop 9am; performance 10.20am

English Touring Opera stage Tosca, Cambridge Arts Theatre, April 25-29. Photo: Richard Hubert Smith

English Touring Opera stage Tosca, Cambridge Arts Theatre, April 25-29. Photo: Richard Hubert Smith - Credit: Archant

Ever heard of a Bishy Barnebee? Know what an Pishamere is? Do you know your Pollywiggles from your Eriwiggles? Find out by helping the Goblin King find his missing daughter, Princess Thomasina. MissAdventures Theatre Company’s whimsical children’s production features colourful characters plus hilarious old East Anglian dialect and wildlife like the emperor dragonfly, natterjack toad and the swallowtail butterfly.

Aimed at ages five-eight, there’s also a little goblins drama workshop before the performance. The show is part of this year’s Ink Festival.

St George’s Day Gala of Light Music, St Peter’s, Sudbury, April 23, 4.30pm

The British Light Music Orchestra make their East Anglia debut, performing popular and entertaining excerpts of music from the British stage and screen in aid of Help for Heroes. The programme incluces Merrie England, HMS Pinafore, Oliver!, Me and My Girl, The Archers, Desert Island Discs, 633 Squadron, Dambusters and - in her centenary year - a tribute to Dame Vera Lynn. There will also be a stirring Last Night of The Proms finale.

Lavenham Sinfonia, Lavenham Church, Lavenham, April 23, 7pm

The first concert of the season features Berlioz’s Overture to Beatrice and Benedict, followed by the return of Caroline Mitchell to play Dvorak’s Romance and Mazurka for violin and orchestra. The programme concludes with Elgar’s Enigma Variations.

Solid Silver 60s Show, Cliffs Pavilion, April 23

This year’s line-up comprises The Merseybeats, Dave Berry, Wayne Fontana, Vanity Fare e Morning, I Life For Sun, Hitchin’ A Ride) and very special guest Chris Montez (Let’s Dance, The More I See You, Some Kinda Fun, There Will Never Be Another You, Call Me).

Marconi’s birthday bash, Sandford Mill, Chelmsford, April 23, 10am-4pm.

Chelmsford Museum curates the celebration of Guglielmo Marconi’s birthday and the legacy of his groundbreaking radio work, which was born in the city. Talks will run at 11am, noon, 2pm and 3pm in the Engine House. The day will have interactive Morse code activities, remote controlled planes and cars from Chelmsford Model Flying Association and Marconi TV cameras where visitors will have the opportunity to read the Sandford Mill News. There will also be new displays in the Marconi Hut where the first radio programme was broadcast from 95 years ago, plus a radio transmission by Chelmsford Amateur Radio Society (CARS) A mini traction engine operated by Chelmsford Society of Model Engineers will provide rides between the Engine House and Barn for those young at heart.

And later in the week...

Omid Djalili - Schmuck for a Night, Ipswich Regent, April 24, 8pm

The hard-working comic and actor’s latest show is Schmuck for a Night.

Amid the observational comedy and anecdotes, hot topics of the day also provide the basis of laughs, though on a long tour and in the fast moving world of Trump, Brexit and now a coming election, the show changes to keep up with events. He said: “I think the show will change even while I’m on stage. It’ll be so current sometimes audiences won’t laugh until they get home and turn on the TV.” Read our interview with him here.

Tasmin Little and Piers Lane, The Apex, Bury St Edmunds, April 25, 7.30pm

Tasmin has established herself as one of today’s leading international violinists, performing on every continent in some of the most prestigious venues of the world. Pianist Piers has been a soloist at the Proms many times and has performed with numerous orchestras. The programme comprises Brahms’ Sonata No. 2 in A major, Brahms’ Sonata No. 1 in G major, Brahms’ Sonatensatz and Brahms’ Sonata No. 3 in D minor.

English Touring Opera, Cambridge Arts Theatre, Cambridge, April 25-29, 7.30pm

ETO’s spring visit includes performances of Puccini’s Tosca on April 25, 28 and 29 plus Gilbert and Sullivan’s Patience on April 26-27.

Tosca is one of the world’s best-loved operas, brimming with lust, corruption and intrigue. Patience pokes fun at Victorian society and its stock characters, with willowy poets, sighing maidens, hearty milkmaids and burly officers galore.

Professor Robert Winston - Modifying Humans, Where Does Genetics Stop?, Mercury Theatre, Colchester, April 25, 7.30pm

History shows humans are obsessed with their genes. Does the sequencing of the human genome really herald a new opportunity for medicine or is there a darker side that we ignore? Will ethical considerations prevent us from the next step – manufacturing stronger, more gifted and very intelligent children? Or will our imperfect knowledge of how our abilities are inherited mean that they there are some major surprises in store?

The Drowsy Chaperone, Beccles Public Hall, April 25-29, 7.45pm

The latest musical offering from the Waveney Light Opera Group, the quirky and hugely entertaining comedy centres around the lone narrator. Set in the roaring 1920s, his story centres around the celebrity wedding of the beautiful starlet Janet Van Der Graff to the dashing Robert Martin, but also takes in Janet’s money-grabbing agent and an infamous Italian womaniser.

World Book Night Quiz, Woodbridge Library, Woodbridge, April 26, 7.30pm

A quiz with a difference, testing your knowledge of things like sport, food, film and television but with a bookish slant. Proceeds will go towards the work of the Friends of Woodbridge Library. Doors open at 7pm to enable teams to get together. Teams should be no more than six people.

As You Like It / Bury Fair, Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, April 26-27 / April 28-29

Students from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA) present a double bill, starting with one of Shakespeare’s best-loved comedies. Rosalind and Orlando’s courtship is played out amidst the turmoil of political rivalry, mistaken identity and exile in the Forest of Arden. In Bury Fair, an affectionate satire of his home town, Thomas Shadwell throws together a female fop, idiotic local wags and a French pretender who dance headlong into chaos.

Dead Guilty, Copdock and Washbrook village hall, Copdock, April 26-28, 7.45pm

Brook Players perform Richard Harris’ tense psychological study of guilt and obsession. Young graphic artist Julia is left housebound and depressed after a car crash that occurred when her business associate suffered a fatal heart attack at the wheel. Suspense builds as the question becomes whether the affair they were enjoying will cost her her own life.

God of Carnage, The Assembly Rooms, Dedham, April 26-29, 7.45pm nightly

The Dedham Players stage Yasmina Reza’s play which is described as a comedy of manners without the manners and a must see for anybody with children. It revolves around two sets of parents, one of whose children has hurt the other at a public park. The parents meet to discuss the situation in a civilised way but as the evening wears on their own behaviour descends into chaos.

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