Wedding Singer hits the right note

The Wedding Singer, Ipswich Regent, until SaturdayANY fan of the film The Wedding Singer would expect a stage adaptation to boast a vibrant mix of colour, 1980s hairstyles and classic synthesised tunes.

Dave Gooderham

The Wedding Singer, Ipswich Regent, until Saturday

ANY fan of the film The Wedding Singer would expect a stage adaptation to boast a vibrant mix of colour, 1980s hairstyles and classic synthesised tunes.

While there are some understandable plot changes and the slightly disappointing lack of well known classic tunes from the decade, the high octane performances alongside some new catchy songs and impressive dance routines more than makes up for it.


You may also want to watch:


This kind of stage show needs both the performers and audience to get on board and work off each other and so it proved on Monday's opening night at the Ipswich Regent.

This was never more the case than with Jonathan Wilkes, playing the lead role of Robbie Hart, who was clearly having the time of his life with a right mix of cheesy performing, an impressive stage voice and a presence to more than match his illustrious best mate Robbie Williams.

Most Read

He slightly lacked the raw anger of original film actor, Adam Sandler, but that is hardly a grievance and he certainly gave it a good go singing the darker songs Casualty of Love and Somebody Kill Me after our hero, a born romantic, gets dumped at the altar.

It is left to bride-to-be Julia, played by Natalie Casey, to restore his faith in love and the on-screen compatibility between the two main stars was always compelling.

Casey, star of BBC comedy Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, displayed a fine voice and has certainly come a long way since her days in teen soap Hollyoaks.

To only speak of the well-known stars would do a disservice to the likes of hilarious Boy George-inspired Nick Hayes and Robbie's sex-obsessed grandma Rosie (expertly played by Tricia Deighton).

Limited props was clearly the right way to go, allowing the performances to shine and the blend of humour - often adult - and romance, which made the film so popular and the Broadway version achieve Tony nominations, always came to the fore.

Billed as the best party in town, a virtual full house would clearly testify to that and, with performances every night until Saturday, the stage is set for a great showing prior to The Wedding Singer hitting the West End.

Dave Gooderham

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter