What’s on Wayne: The Big Question

Peter Andre reportedly doesn't let kids Junior and Princess use social media when at his home. Photo

Peter Andre reportedly doesn't let kids Junior and Princess use social media when at his home. Photo: Sarah Lucy Brown - Credit: Archant

Each Saturday in the East Anglian Daily Times’ heaven section, we pose a question about something that’s happening in the news - from is it right to ban your kids from using social media to the new line-up of The Great British Bake-off. We’d love to hear your views on the topic of the week, tweeted every Monday by @WhatsonWayne. To get involved, email me your thoughts and a small head and shoulders photo.

This week’s big question was: Singer-songwriter and TV presenter Peter Andre has reportedly banned his children Junior and Princess from using social media while at his home to “maintain their innocence as long as he can”. Is he right? Most people thought so.

Caroline Culot said she applauded Peter Andre, adding it’s a difficult dilemma for parents. However, would you really allow a child to look at horrific images or read bad language in a book or magazine?

“Exactly the same principles need to be applied. Andre spends time playing games with his children instead and how fantastic. They’ll soon grow up and be practically surgically attached to some device – keep them away from the social media darkness that’s at the touch of a button for as long as you can.”

Charlotte Smith-Jarvis agreed it’s a bit of a catch 22. On one hand we want to preserve our children’s innocence. On the other, by preventing them from using social media we take away their access to modern culture – which for kids is seemingly mostly online these days.

“I don’t allow my children to use Facebook or Twitter, but they are allowed to communicate with friends via Whatsapp and use apps like Music.ly. I’m happy for the children to use these as long as I can control the security settings on those platforms and monitor their use.”

Donna Clarke thought the fact Andre’s children are in the public eye as well created extra concerns: I think they need to be allowed to grow and develop a sense of maturity themselves before having to wade through the many issues parents face when dealing with social media and their children.”

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Ross Bentley jokes it appears Peter Andre’s parenting sense is more on key than his singing.

“The more I see and hear about social media, the more I question whether it is good for society as whole, especially the young and impressionable. At least us, the older generation, have had a time when everything we did was not recorded online. When our self-worth came from within rather than how many likes or friends we have on Facebook; when we could do something, go somewhere, have a thought with out seeking affirmation from our ‘friends’.

“It seems to me that social media creates a narcissistic tendency – another selfie, another picture of me, me, me. I commend Andre’s sentiment but also wonder how long he will be able to hold out when phones and tablets are omnipresent and peer pressure to get online is so immense.”

What are your thoughts?

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