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Film review: Heavy on Atmosphere and tone Genesis is an engaging and visually arresting Sci-Fi.

PUBLISHED: 10:34 17 July 2018 | UPDATED: 10:34 17 July 2018

We review Genesis which is now available on DVD Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/NIOLOX

We review Genesis which is now available on DVD Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/NIOLOX

Archant

It might be tempting for some to dismiss Freddie Hutton-Mills and Bart Ruspoli's latest directorial effort as yet another straight-to-DVD and digital release to hit the bargain bin at your local DVD shop; however, to do so would be to deprive oneself of a unique and enjoyable viewing experience.

Set in 2069, the film focuses on the civilians of Eden, an underground city to which they have been forced to retreat from the uninhabitable world above. As provisions deplete and unrest grows scientists and politicians devote all their resources into creating an artificial being who may be the key to their survival.

The directors touch upon interesting, if familiar subject matter here - what it means to be human, social divides and mankind’s destruction of Earth - however, these powerful and pertinent themes often get lost amidst the film’s myriad of intricate and complex side-stories.

Despite this, the emotional core of the film remains clear and Hutton-Mills and Ruspoli’s decision to end the film on a dark, ambiguous note is a refreshing change from the optimism of many of the Science Fictions being churned out today.

While the pair’s direction is assured the film’s true star is the location. Largely filmed in Kelvedon, production designer Niina Topp utilises the dark, claustrophobic interiors of Eden and the vast, desolate landscape of the outside world to full effect, creating a world that is both visually striking and deeply unsettling.

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